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AC 30 
1975/76 
UG 
Evening 

C2_ 



[RSITY 



NEW 
HAVEN 



Evening 
College 





University of New Haven 
Continuing Education Bulletin 

1975-1976 



CONTENTS 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



IV 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Evening Credit Program 

Summer School 

Admission 

Degrees 

Tuition 11 

Financial Aid 12 

Evening Student Council 14 

Library 15 

Alumni Association 16 



1 


TABLE 


2 


OF 


3 


CONTENTS 


5 




10 





HI 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 17 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 31 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



51 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 



63 
64 
65 



CALENDAR 



Summer Session 1975 



Registration period 


Tuesday-Tuesday 


May 27-June 10 


Tuition due on or before 


Tuesday 


June 10 


Classes begin 


Thursday 


June 12 


Holiday (Independence Day) 


Friday 


July 4 


First term final examinations 


Thursday 


July 17 


Second term classes begin 


Monday 


July 21 


Second term final examinations 


Monday 


August 25 



IV 



Fall Semester 1975 

Registration for current and former students Monday-Friday August 11-22 

Registration for new students Tuesday-Wednesday August 26-27 

Tuition due on or before Friday August 29 

Holiday (Labor Day) Monday September 1 

Classes begin Wednesday September 3 

Last day to ADD courses Friday September 19 
MID SEMESTER 

Last day to DROP courses Friday October 24 

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Wednesday-Friday November 26-28 

Classes end Friday December 12 

Final examinations Monday-Friday December 15-19 



Spring Semester 1976 



Registration for current and former students 


Friday-Friday 


Registration for nev* students 


Monday-Tuesday 


Tuition due on or before 


Wednesday 


Classes begin 


Friday 


Last day to ADD courses 


Friday 


Holiday (Washington's Birthday) 


Monday 


MID SEMESTER 




Last day to DROP courses 


Friday 


Spring vacation 


Saturday-Sunday 


Classes resume 


Monday 


Holiday (Good Friday) 


Friday 


Classes end 


Friday 


Final examinations 


Monday-Friday 


Commencement 


Sunday 



January 2-9 

January 12-13 

January 14 

January 16 

January 23 

February 16 

March 5 

March 13-21 

March 22 

April 16 

May 7 

May 10-13 

June 6 



Summer Session 1976 



Registration period 


Tuesday-Friday 


May 25-June 11 


Tuition due on or before 


Friday 


June 11 


Classes begin 


Monday 


June 14 


Holiday (Independence Day) 


Monday 


July 4 


First term final examinations 


Tuesday 


July 20 


Second term classes begin 


Thursday 


July 22 


Second term final examinations 


Thursday 


August 26 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The University of New Haven (then New Haven College) was founded 
by the Y.M.C.A. in 1920 as a branch of Northeastern University. During 
the first years, it functioned as a community college, providing an edu- 
cation to the student who could not afford the time or tuition for regular 
four-year colleges and universities. 

In 1926 the college was incorporated by the Connecticut General As- 
sembly and authorized to grant an associate in science degree, and in 
1958 it was authorized to offer bachelor degree programs to both day 
and evening students. 

Classroom space at Yale University was used untN the acquisition in 
1960 of the present West Haven campus. The original campus had a 
main classroom building, a library and a small administration build- 
ing. To these have been added the student center, the School of En- 
gineering building, the Graduate School building (which houses the 
School of Business Administration), a residence hall, a bookstore, the 
Gymnasium-Auditorium building on the 28-acre North Campus (where 
there are athletic fields and tennis courts), and the Marvin K. Peterson 
Library. 

A new and major strengthening of the college came in 1969 with the 
establishment of the Graduate School. Initially, programs were offered 
only in business administration and industrial engineering; today a 
broad scope of graduate programs is available. By 1974, more than 
one thousand students were pursuing graduate work at the University. 

In October, 1970, the New Haven College Board of Governors voted 
to change the name of the institution to the University of New Haven, 
and this action was approved by the State of Connecticut. 

The University has three administrative divisions: the undergraduate 
schools of Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Business Administration; 
the Division of Continuing Education; and the Graduate School. 

Included in the Division of Continuing Education are the evening col- 
lege, the extension programs, summer school sessions and interses- 
sion programs, and the Division of Special Studies. 



THE UNIVERSITY 
OF NEW HAVEN 



DIVISIONS OF 
THE UNIVERSITY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



ACCREDITATIONS 
AND MEMBERSHIPS 



OBJECTIVES 



A co-educational, non-sectarian, independent university, the Univer- 
sity of New Haven is fully accredited by the Connecticut Department 
of Education. It holds membership in the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, one of six regional accrediting associations in 
the United States. Membership in this association indicates that the 
university has been carefully evaluated and found to meet the stand- 
ards established by qualified educators. 

The university is a member of the Association of American Colleges, 
the Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges and the College 
Entrance Examining Board, and of regional and national professional 
organizations. 

Students in the Division of Continuing Education generally have a deep 
interest in the furtherance of their personal and professional goals. 
Every attempt is made to assist these students in planning an indivi- 
dualized program of study designed to make the most profitable use 
of the available curricula. Guided by the student's ambitions and 
needs, the Continuing Education staff counsels students in an effort 
to match their strengths and weaknesses with the most appropriate 
courses and programs. 

The University believes that work is good educational experience, but 
it is improved when related to academic instruction. This means that a 
student's work and scholastic program should be integrated as far as 
possible. By such integration the traditional barrier between the aca- 
demic and the practical may be broken down. 

In accordance with this viewpoint, the University encourages and assists 
its students to seek employment related to their degree programs or 
to pursue courses of study related to their work. The relationship 
between work and study necessarily varies, of course, but becomes 
increasingly important after the first year of study. The placement 
activity of the University is designed to implement the idea of an 
integrated program of work and study. 



EVENING CREDIT 
PROGRAMS 



The Evening Division offers programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Computer Technology and 
Associate in Science. 

Degrees and major fields of study offered are detailed on pages 17, 
31 and 51 (preceding the sections on each school). 

Most courses, except laboratory and certain four-hour courses offered 
in the evening credit program, are scheduled to meet from 7 to 9:45 
p.m. one night a week. The university operates Monday through Satur- 
day. 



A student may carry as few as three semester hours or as many as 
eleven. The same academic standards are required regardless of the 
number of credits carried. 



The Graduate School currently offers masters degrees in: business ad- 
ministration (including options in accounting and hotel management), 
engineering, industrial engineering, environmental engineering, opera- 
tions research, computer and information science, criminal justice, 
community psychology, organizational-industrial psychology, public ad- 
ministration, and an interdisciplinary MBA-MSIE program. 

Prospective students seeking detailed information on any of the gradu- 
ate programs and/or an application form should write or call: Dean of 
the Graduate School, University of New Haven, 300 Orange Ave., West 
Haven, CT 06516, (203) 934-6321, ext. 280 or 316. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Graduate courses normally meet between 4:30 and 8:30 p.m., 
day through Friday. 



Mon- 



One of the major functions of an urban university is to identify the edu- 
cational needs of the community it serves and develop programs to 
meet those needs. The University of New Haven has always responded 
to and will continue to respond to specific needs of the community and 
individual students. Both graduate and undergraduate courses are of- 
fered in extension programs in various locations across Connecticut. 

This Division offers a series of professional certificate courses in 
engineering, business, and general areas. They are usually designed 
to provide supplemental knowledge and skills needed in specialized 
jobs in business and industry, and do not carry academic credit. Fur- 
ther information may be obtained by requesting separate schedules 
and course folders from the Director of the Division of Special Studies. 
Courses are approved for Veterans' Benefits. A certificate is granted up- 
on successful course completion. 



EXTENSION PROGRAMS 



DIVISION OF 
SPECIAL STUDIES 



Summer sessions are offered at the University of New Haven in both 
day and evening courses. 

Students from other institutions may attend to make up deficiencies, 
satisfy prerequisites for courses, or acquire advanced standing in their 
parent schools. Credits earned at the University of New Haven are gen- 
erally acceptable to parent schools but, for the protection of the stu- 
dent, the written approval of the parent school is required (letter of 
authorization). 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



University of New Haven students may wish to attend summer school 
to lighten the study load during the regular year, to shorten the normal 
time required for a degree, to take preparatory work or make up de- 
ficiencies, or to take additional work beyond degree requirements yet 
complete a program in the normal time. 

A list of courses to be offered each summer is available from the Divi- 
sion of Continuing Education in the spring. 



INTERSESSION 



Courses are offered during intersession, the semester break between 
fall arid spring semesters. The intersession program includes both regu- 
lar and special courses and seeks to blend innovative and traditional 
methods of teaching, including team-teaching, field trips, lectures, 
laboratory work and research projects. A complete list of intersession 
courses is available from the Division of Continuing Education by 
Nov. 1. 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAMS 



In addition to traditional professions such as law, medicine and the 
ministry, many other vocations require students to continue their train- 
ing after receiving a bachelor's degree. Students who plan to train for 
a profession at the graduate level should write to the university they 
expect to attend for a statement of entrance requirements. Prescribed 
programs in the major areas will be modified to meet entrance require- 
ments into professional programs or to meet special needs of individual 
students. Such programs must be approved in writing by the appropri- 
ate department chairman. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY 
PROGRAMS 



An interdisciplinary major, in two or more major departments, may be 
planned for students with particular needs and interests. In such cases, 
the dean will appoint a faculty member from each department to plan 
with the student a sequence of courses generally consisting of existing 
courses and independent study. A minimum of 51 credits in the area 
of interest must be completed to satisfy graduation requirements. The 
program must be approved by the department chairman and forwarded 
to the registrar to be filed in the student's file. 



DOUBLE MAJOR 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



A minor or an associate degree may be taken in a department other 
than that of the student's major concurrent with work on the major 
program. A full double major may be taken by fulfilling all the core re- 
quirements for each major, including the core requirements of each 
division and department involved. A minimum of at least an additional 
30 sem. hrs. is required beyond the number required for one major. 



Advanced study courses are offered in all departments for qualified un- 
dergraduates pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree or the Bachelor 
of Arts degree. These courses may include a thesis, tutorial work or 
independent study which permits students to work intensively in areas 
of special interest. 

The University of New Haven welcomes applications from students from 
all geographic areas, from public or private schools, and from all races, 
economic levels and religions. 

Each school of the university has its own admission requirements which 
are defined in detail in the pertinent sections of this bulletin. Gener- 
ally, graduates of accredited secondary schools or persons who have a 
state high school diploma* are eligible for admission. 

In some cases, an adult who has completed at least two years of sec- 
ondary school with a satisfactory record may be considered, provided 
he or she performs exceptionally well on the required placement ex- 
aminations. Such an admission will be tentative for one year, and dur- 
ing that time the student must pass the examinations for the state 
high school diploma. No one who has not completed at least two years 
of secondary school will be considered. 

With the exception of auditors, students taking any course, whether 
for a degree or not, must meet admission requirements. 

Applicants from secondary schools are required to take admission tests, 
including scholastic aptitude, mechanics of English, and reading com- 
prehension. College Entrance Examination Board results, if satisfac- 
tory, are accepted In place of the University of New Haven admission 
requirements. 

Persons seeking admission should call or write the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education to arrange a personal interview. During the inter- 
view, the applicant will complete a personal data form and plan his or 
her program. Interviews may be scheduled during office hours at the 
convenience of the applicant. 

When the applicant decides to seek admission, an application fee must 
be paid. The university then requests the secondary school record 
of the applicant. Those applicants who have attended other colleges or 
universities must present transcripts from those Institutions, whether 
applying for admission or applying for advanced standing. The stu- 
dent must arrange this individually, and by using a form which is 
available for this purpose. 

* Information regarding the examination for the state high school diploma may be obtained 
from the Director of Admissions or by writing to the Bureau of Youth Services, State Depart- 
ment of Education, State Office Building, Hartford, Connecticut 06103. 



ADVANCED STUDY 



ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS 



APPLICATION 
PROCEDURES 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



REGISTRATION 



All new students must register in person at the Office of Continuing 
Education. Currently enrolled students may register by mail and forms 
will be mailed to each student prior to registration dates. A separate 
registration is required for each of the semesters and for summer ses- 
sions. 

There are two parts to registration: the completion of the registration 
forms and the payment of tuition. There is a penalty fee for delaying 
either of these two processes beyond the end of the registration period. 

Auditors follow the same procedure and pay the same fees as credit 
students. 

Students are urged to plan their programs carefully before completing 
registration forms to avoid the need for changes. Once the registration 
period has ended, a "change of registration" fee is charged for each 
change made, payable when the form requesting the change is com- 
pleted. 



TRANSFERRING TO 
THE UNIVERSITY 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Transfer students may apply to the University of New Haven after suc- 
cessfully completing one or more semesters at an accredited college. 

A student with a two-year degree and at least a 2.00 quality point 
ratio (QPR) will receive transfer credit for as many hours as the degree 
required. No more than two years of credit from a two-year college 
will be accepted, except by authorization of the dean of the school in 
which the student is enrolled. 

If a student does not have an associate degree, transfer credit is given 
for grades of "C" or higher. The dean of the school or the chairman 
of the department makes the final decision concerning the total number 
of acceptable transfer credits. In accordance with the requirements of a 
particular department, a student may be required to take an English 
or mathematics examination. 

The maximum number of equivalent semester hours of transfer credit 
from any four-year source is 90 hours, except by written authorization 
of the dean of the school in which the student is enrolled. 

The residency requirement for all University of New Haven degrees is 
30 credit hours. For the associate degree, 12 semester hours must be 
in the field of specialization; for the bachelor's degree, 18 semester 
hours must be in the field of specialization. 

Transfer credit from other colleges will be officially granted on the 
completion of 12 semester hours at the University of New Haven with 
a satisfactory academic record. 



Credits may be transferred from the University of New Haven to any 
otiier college or university by obtaining a letter of authorization from 
the other institution. 



TRANSFERRING FROM 
THE UNIVERSITY 



Since the University of New Haven is an accredited institution, its credit 
will be given consideration by the major institutions of the country in 
terms of the achievement and promise of the student seeking transfer. 
Other institutions will also evaluate specific courses for length and con- 
tent in relation to their specific requirements. 



A student who has independent knowledge of the content of an under- 
graduate course offered by the university may, with the approval of the 
respective department chairman and dean, take a special crediting 
examination in lieu of taking the course. 



CREDITING 
EXAMINATIONS 



No student may take crediting examinations during the first or last 
semester in which he is enrolled. To graduate, a student must earn at 
least 30 semester hours through regular course work. 



There are three classifications of students in the evening credit pro- 
gram: 

Degree student — The degree student indicates on his registration that 
he plans to complete the requirements for the A.S., B.A. or B.S. 
degree. The degree student must satisfy all the admission requirements 
and be a fully matriculatd student. 

Non-degree student — The non-degree student does not intend to meet 
all the requirements for a degree but selects certain subjects which 
are offered as part of the degree requirements. The non-degree student 
must satisfy all admission requirements so that if he or she later wishes 
to become a degree student this can be done by indicating it on his 
or her registration. The non-degree student also must be fully matricu- 
lated. 



CLASSIFICATION 
OF STUDENTS 



Auditor — An auditor is a person who wishes merely to attend class and 
listen to the discussion. Since auditors are not obligated to meet any 
of the admission requirements, they are not allowed to participate in 
discussion or take tests or examinations graded by the instructor. They 
are not subject to attendance regulations and are not granted credit. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



8 



SCHOLASTIC Grading system — The following grading system is in use and except 

DTPiii ATinMo where otherwise noted applies to both examinations and term work. 

REGULATIONS The weight of a final examination grade is a matter individually deter- 

mined by each instructor. 

A Superior 

B Good 

C Fair 

D Lowest passing grade 

F Failure or withdrawal after midpoint with unsatisfactory work 

Inc. Incomplete. 

1. The grade of Incomplete indicates that some work remains 
to be completed to gain academic credit for a course. 

2. Work to remove an Incomplete must be performed within 
twelve months following the last day of the semester in 
which an Incomplete is received. 

3. When such work is completed, the instructor will assign a 
final grade for the course. 

4. If the student fails to complete unfulfilled academic as- 
signments within twelve months, the grade of W will be 
entered on the student's record. This grade will be final; 
no further opportunity to complete the course will be 
available to a student after this time. 

W Withdrawal indicates either withdrawal prior to the midpoint 
of semester, or withdrawal after the midpoint of semester 
with satisfactory work at that time. 

S Satisfactory (given only in non-credit courses) 

U Unsatisfactory (given only in non-credit courses) 

Fulltime students must complete a minimum of 12 credits per semester 
to retain their fulltime status. Completion is defined as receipt of a 
letter grade (A to F) as opposed to W or Incomplete. 

A student may not register for more than 18 semester hours in any 
semester without written permission of the dean of his school (19 
semester hours in certain engineering programs). In most instances a 
student must have a cumulative quality point ratio of 3.20 in order to 
register for more than 18 hours in one semester. 

Grade reports — Reports of final grades will be mailed to the student 
soon after the close of each semester. A copy of the report will be en- 
UNivERsiTY OF NEW HAVEN closed for those who wish to forward it to their employers. 



Academic standards — The academic standing of each student will be 
determined on the basis of the student's quality point rating (QPR) 
each semester. 

To determine quality point ratios, each letter grade is assigned a quality 
point value: 

A 4 quality points D 1 quality point 

B 3 quality points F quality points 

C 2 quality points 

The quality point ratio is obtained by multiplying the quality point 
value of each grade by the number of semester hours of the course, 
then dividing the total quality points by the total semester hours. 

Students are required to maintain a quality point ratio in accordance 
with the following scale: 

Quality point ratio of 1.50 for 3-30 semester hours attempted 7 

1.60 for 31-45 semester hours attempted 
1.70 for 46-60 semester hours attempted 
1.80 for 61-75 semester hours attempted 
1.90 for 76-90 semester hours attempted 
2.00 for 91 or more semester hours attempted 

To determine a transfer student's class (freshman, sophomore, etc.) 
standing, his total semester hours (those received at another college 
plus those earned at the University of New Haven) are applied to the 
graduated scale. However, only the cumulative average earned at the 
University of New Haven is considered in determining the student's 
academic standing. 

Attendance regulations — Evening students are allowed only two ab- 
sences per semester for a 3 or 4 semester hour course. If the student is 
absent more than twice, permission to continue in the course must be 
obtained from the instructor. 

Probation and dismissal — Failure to earn the required cumulative 
quality point ratio will place a student on academic probation for the 
following year of enrollment. A student is automatically dismissed when 
he receives a third probation or when his quality point ratio for any 
one year is less than 1.00. Academic probation for transfer students 
is determined in accordance with the same graduated scale as for non- 
transfer students. 

Readmission — Application for readmission after a student has been 
dismissed will normally be considered only after the lapse of a semester 
and only when the student provides evidence which indicates his prob- 
able success if readmitted. general information 



Unusual circumstances may permit earlier application if the student's 
dean and department chairman successfully petition the Academic 
Standing and Admissions Committee to review the applicant's case. 

Requests for readmission should be submitted in writing to the chair- 
man of the Academic Standing and Admissions Committee at least 
three weeks before the opening of the semester and should include evi- 
dence supporting the student's belief that he will succeed if readmitted. 

Readmission is not automatic. The Academic Standing and Admissions 
Committee reviews each application and recommends rejection, ac- 
ceptance or conditional acceptance to the director of admissions. 



DEGREES 



10 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The baccalaureate or associate degree will be conferred at commence- 
ment when the student has met all the requirements of his program 
and has met the following university requirements: 

1. Has earned a cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00. 

2. Has been recommended by the faculty. 

3. Has met all financial obligations. 

4. Has completed the last 30 semester hours at the University of 
New Haven. 

Honors — Honors may be conferred on candidates for graduation who 
have completed at least 60 semester hours of work at the University 
of New Haven in their junior and senior years. The following standards 
shall be used: 

1. The bachelor degree Cum Laude may be awarded to a student 
whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.25 at the end 
of the first semester of his or her senior year and who continues 
to attain the same standard for the rest of the year. 

2. The bachelor degree Magna Cum Laude may be awarded to a 
student whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.50 at 
the end of the first semester of the senior year and who con- 
tinues to attain the same standard for the rest of the year; whose 
quality point ratio in all courses counting toward his major is at 
least 3.50; and who has completed all the suggested courses 
within his curriculum. 

3. The bachelor degree Summa Cum Laude may be awarded to a 
student whos cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.70 at the 
end of the first semester of his senior year and who continues to 
attain the same standard for the rest of the year; whose quality 
point ratio is all courses counting toward his major is at least 
3.70; and who has completed all the suggested courses within his 
curriculum. 



A degree With Honors is awarded to associate degree students who 
have a quality point ratio of 3.25 for the semester hours specifically 
required for the degree program from which they are being graduated 
and who have taken 30 or more hours of required work at the Uni- 
versity of New Haven. 

A degree With High Honors is awarded to associate degree students who 
have a quality point ratio of 3.50 based on the same considerations as 
above. 

In determining eligibility for degrees with honor, credits earned by 
crediting examinations and electives in excess of those required will 
not be considered. 

Dean's List — All part-time students who have accumulated a minimum 
of 14 semester hours at the university will automatically be considered 
for the Dean's List at the end of each semester. A cumulative quality 
point ratio of at least 3.20 is required. 



Evening Division Regular Academic Year 

Application fee — payable only once at the initial time of ap- 
plication. Not refundable $10.00 

Tuition — per credit hour or equivalent $50.00 each semester 

This includes the Student Activity Fee which covers sub- 
scription to the University newspaper, use of the Student 
Center, and helps to defray cost of all student activities 
and facilities. 

Change of registration — assessed for changing courses or 

sections after the completion of registration 5.00 

Summer Terms 

For information regarding both Day and Evening summer 
sessions, request the Summer School Bulletin. 

Other Charges 

Laboratory and Breakage fees — payable each semester by 
students registering for courses requiring the laboratory 
fee. See Course Description for specific amounts. Not re- 
fundable 

Make-up Examination — assessed when a student is permitted 
to take an end-of-semester examination at other than the 
scheduled time except for conflicts caused by the exami- 
nation schedule 5.00 



TUITION 
AND FEES 



11 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



12 



Make-up Test — assessed when a student is permitted to 

make up an announced test during tiie semester 3.00 

Auditors — the fee for a student auditor in any course or 
courses is the same as if the courses were taken for credit. 

Graduation fee 35.00 

Assessed regardless of participation in exercises; no re- 
duction will be made for non-attendance. For graduation 
in June, fee is due no later than March 1 of year of gradua- 
tion; for January commencement, fee is due before Octo- 
ber 15 of prior calendar year. Late fee is $25.00 

Transcript of academic work — no charge for the first one; 

thereafter, per copy 1-00 

Payment of bills — Tuition, fees and other university charges are pay- 
able at the time of registration. Payment made by check or money order 
should be made payable to the University of New Haven. The uni- 
versity also accepts payments by Master Charge and BankAmericard. 

As a convenience to those who desire to spread their payments out over 
a period of time, a deferred education payment plan is available to 
part-time students carrying six or more credits or the equivalent. De- 
tafls of this plan are available in the Business Office. 

Because of the short duration of the summer terms, the total amount 
due for tuition and fees is due and payable at the time of registration for 
each term. 

The university withholds grades, transcripts and honorable dismissal 
from any student whose account is in arrears. 



FINANCIAL AID 




Various types of financial aid are available at the university. A limited 
number of partial tuition grants-in-aid is available during fall and 
spring semesters. The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program is 
designed to assist needy students entering post-secondary education. 
Applications and information usually are available through high school 
guidance offices and the student makes direct application to the Pro- 
gram offices. Grants are also available to full time employees of a 
publicly funded law enforcement agency under the Law Enforcement 
Student Grant Program. Payments of up to $300 a semester are pro- 
vided to part time students working toward a degree in this field. Cri- 
teria are need and scholastic standing. Various organizations make 
available each year a limited number of academic scholarships. For 
further information, contact the director of the Division of Continuing 
Education or the director of financial aid. 



From the University — Students are required to discuss their intentions 
with the Director of Continuing Education before withdrawing from the 
University. 

From a program — Students considering a change in program should 
first discuss the matter with the department chairman of the proposed 
new program. If it is agreed that the change is advisable, written per- 
mission will be granted. Forms for making a change are provided at the 
evening reception desk. 

Courses changes — Forms are available at the Division of Continuing 
Education office. 

Registration does not carry with it the right of an automatic refund of 
tuition in cases of withdrawal. No deduction is made for temporary ab- 
sence from classes, nor is any refund made if a student is suspended 
or dismissed. Requests for withdrawal should be made in person 
through the Evening Office. If this is not possible, a letter requesting 
withdrawal must be sent to the Director of Continuing Education. Tele- 
phone requests cannot be honored. 

Tuition is refunded or cancelled by one of two methods upon receipt 
of formal withdrawal request before the end of the fourth week of a 
semester: 

1. Percentage basis for any reason during the first four weeks of a 
semester: 



1st week - 
2nd week 
3rd week- 



80% 
-60% 
-40% 



4th week — 20% 
after 5th week — 0% 



2. Pro-rata basis of tuition before end of fourth week in situations 
involving: 

a) death or protracted illness of a student 

b) involuntary induction into military service 

c) transfer or charge in work initiated by employer which pre- 

cludes meeting class schedules. 

Summer session and intersession — A refund of 50% of tuition will be 
made only in the case of withdrawal from a course or courses within the 
first week of the summer term. There is no refund of summer tuition 
after the first week, in intersession, a refund of 50% of tuition will be 
made on the first day of class only. 

This policy is necessary to protect the University, since the university 
plans its expenses and bases its budget on full collection of tuition and 
fees from all registered students, and assumes the obligation of sup- 
plying instruction and other services throughout the year. 



WITHDRAWAL AND 
REFUND OF TUITION 



13 




CAREER 
DEVELOPMENT 



14 



Changes in arrangements — Because of the difficulty of determining 
long-range economic trends, the University reserves the right to make 
those changes in tuition, fees and other costs v*/hich, in the judgment of 
the Board of Governors, are necessary and just. No changes in charges 
will be made retroactive. 

Career Development Office This office has two primary functions with- 
in the University: career counseling and placement. The staff works 
closely with the Counseling Center to help determine an appropriate 
career path for individual students. To assist students in a career 
choice, individual counseling, a career library and career seminars are 
available. In addition, a program of on-campus recruiting visits by em- 
ployers is arranged each year for the benefit of University of New 
Haven students, both undergraduate and graduate. 

While the Career Development Office is not an employment service, 
listings of full-time and part-time openings are maintained to provide a 
common meeting ground for employers and prospective employees. 

Students seeking employment should visit the office personally as early 
as possible to discuss their plans. Alumni seeking positions are invited 
to use the services of the office. 

Employers wishing to list positions with the Career Development Office 
need only call the office or write, giving a description of the position 
available and other details. There is never any fee charged for listing 
a position. 

Evening students should call the Career Development Office for ap- 
pointments. 



COUNSELING 



Counseling and Guidance The University maintains counseling and 
guidance officers on its staff. Staff and faculty also reserve many hours 
for counseling with students. Appointments for this purpose should be 
made at the Evening Reception Office. 



EVENING 
STUDENT 
COUNCIL 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Membership in the Evening Student Council is open to all evening credit 
students who have successfully completed one full semester. Nomina- 
tions and elections by secret ballot are conducted in the spring of each 
year. Council meetings are held monthly; all evening credit students 
are welcome to attend. 

The Council has three primary objectives: 

To unite the evening students to promote the welfare of the evening 

student body of the University. 

To give counsel and encouragement to all evening students of the 

University and to develop a school spirit among them. 

To convey evening student opinion to the administration and to work 

with the officers of the University to accomplish student objectives. 



Fraternities In 1967, the Criminal Justice students formed a joint 
day and evening fraternity. Membership is open to all students pur- 
suing a degree in Criminal Justice. Students who are interested in join- 
ing the Criminal Justice fraternity should contact the Director of 
Continuing Education. 

Honor Society In 1969, the Evening Division was accepted as a mem- 
ber of the National Honor Society Alpha Sigma Lambda. There are 
presently 87 members in the Alpha Sigma chapter of the University. 
Membership in the Honor Society is by invitation during the spring 
semester of each academic year. Any student interested in the Honor 
Society should contact the Director of Continuing Education. 

Student Publications Evening students may volunteer their services 
to work on any of the student publications: The News, the University's 
student newspaper; The Chariot, the University yearbook; The Noise- 
less Spider, a literary publication; and The UNH Student Handbook. 

FM Radio Station WNHU, 88.7 MHZ, is the University's student-oper- 
ated FM radio station. Located in the Student Center, the 1,700 watt 
station serves the Student Body and the greater New Haven community. 
All work and management is done by students and any student may 
volunteer his help. 




The new Marvin K. Peterson Library, named for President Emeritus 
Peterson, was dedicated Oct. 20, 1974. Built at a cost of $1,664,280, 
the new library has a capacity of 300,000 bound volumes. It adjoins the 
main administration building and includes a rare book room, a special 
collection room, a music room, archives and spacious reading and 
reference areas. Study is made convenient by modern research facili- 
ties and equipment, including eight microreading stations and three 
microform reader-printers. 

The Library contains more than 85,000 volumes, 35,000 U.S. docu- 
ments, over 2500 LP's, extensive corporation annual reports, pam- 
phlet files, and microfilm. The Library subscribes to 975 periodicals 
and extensive back-issue files are maintained. 

The resources of the New Haven and West Haven Public Libraries are 
available to students (non-residents must pay a fee). Under a reciprocal 
policy, students may charge material from Albertus Magnus and Quinni- 
piac libraries by presenting their validated ID's. 

The Student Center The Student Center provides a focal point for all 
student activities. Offering lounges, student offices, a game room, a 
large cafeteria and a snack bar, the facility has been designed to serve 
as a center for the student's non-academic college interests. 

The Rathskellar, also located in the Student Center, opens daily, serv- 
ing draft beer and snacks. 



LIBRARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Bookstore The University bookstore offers new and used text mater- 
ials, art and engineering supplies, and a large variety of University-em- 
blemed gift items. 

Social Activities Evening students sponsor annual social events, in- 
cluding serving refreshments for new freshmen and transfer students in 
September, the President's Fall Welcoming Dance, the Children's 
Christmas Party, a spring dance and a graduation dance. 

Veterans Affairs Since the University has one of the largest veteran 
enrollments in Connecticut, an Office of Veterans Affairs, with a full- 
time Coordinator and secretary, is maintained. The Veterans Adminis- 
tration has assigned to the University a full-time V.A. representative 
who maintains liaison directly with state and national V.A. offices. In 
addition to processing applications for various V.A. benefits, the camp- 
us Veterans office provides a wide range of supportive services for veter- 
ans attending the University. Assistance is available in academic areas 
J^Q and special help such as tutorial assistance is available. 

ALUMNI Membership in the Alumni Association is acquired immediately upon 

Aoor»r>i ATir»M graduation. All degree graduates of the University as well as diploma 

ASSOCIATION graduates of the School of Executive Development and the Management 

Center become members automatically. Including the class of 1974, 
there are nearly 7,000 members of the Alumni Association. A member 
of the administrative staff of the University serves as Director of Alum- 
ni Relations. An Executive Committee conducts the affairs of the As- 
sociation during the period between meetings and also serves as a 
planning group. There is an alumni fund chairman for annual giving. 

In addition to the bi-annual meeting, other meetings of social and 
educational interest occur during the year, and a quarterly publication, 
the Alumni News, is mailed without charge to each alumnus. Alumni 
Homecoming is an annual event occurring in October of each year. 

The Alumni Association is represented on the Board of Governors by 
a member who is elected to the Board for a term of two years. The 
president of the Association serves on the Board of Governors as an 
ex-officio member. 

Membership on the Alumni Advisory Council is by invitation. Twenty 
or more outstanding graduates of the University constitute the group. 
The Council is an advisory board to the University in the conduct of 
alumni affairs. Its primary objectives are to strengthen alumni relations, 
advise on matters of top-level policy involving the alumni, improve 
alumni communications, and assist in planning and conducting alumni 
events. The Council meets quarterly at the University with the President 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN °^ *^^ University and the Director of Alumni Relations. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

DOUGLAS ROBILLARD, DEAN 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



AMERICAN STUDIES 

ART 

BIOLOGY 

CHEMISTRY 

ECONOMICS 

ENGLISH 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

HISTORY 

MATHEMATICS 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHYSICS 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

SOCIAL WELFARE 

SOCIOLOGY 

WORLD MUSIC 



Associate in Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



BIOLOGY 
CHEMISTRY 
COMMERCIAL AND 

ADVERTISING ART 
GENERAL STUDIES 
JOURNALISM 
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY 

AND HEALTH 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



BIOLOGY 
CHEMISTRY 
FIRE SCIENCE 
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY 

AND HEALTH 
PHYSICS 



ARTS AND 
SCIENCES 



18 



With varied programs of studies and an exciting cultural location, the 
University offers unique advantages to the student, for there are nu- 
merous opportunities for educational experiences outside the class- 
room. 

Several libraries in the vicinity offer specialized collections; a natural 
history museum, art exhibitions, creative arts and dance workshops, 
historical societies, and vi^omen's groups play a role. Speakers and per- 
formers are brought to the campus by the Arts and Sciences Forum, 
and a constant procession of important speakers and performing artists 
come to the New/ Haven area. The Schubert Theater presents pre- 
Broadway showings of new plays and road-company performances of 
hit shows; The Long Wharf is an excellent regional group and the Yale 
Repertory Theater is innovative and exciting. The opportunity to see 
films is as good here as it would be in many larger cities. 

There are opportunities to supplement classroom and book studies with 
work experiences at mental health clinics, hospitals, social welfare 
agencies, couits and corrections institutions. The area presents nu- 
merous ethnic enclaves and neighborhoods. Long Island Sound and 
nearby ski areas offer recreation. New York, with its wealth of concerts, 
art galleries, lectures, plays, films, sports events, is less than two 
hours away. 



MINORS 



APPLICATION 



Minors are offered in the following subjects: 



Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

English 

Fire Science 

History 

Journalism 

Mathematics 



Occupational Safety 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Social Welfare 
Sociology 
World Music 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



An applicant for admission to the Arts & Sciences Program must be a 
graduate of an approved secondary school or the equivalent. While 
no set program of high school subjects is prescribed, an applicant must 
meet the standard of the University in respect to the high school 
average and present 15 acceptable units of satisfactory work, includ- 
ing 9 or more units of college preparatory subjects. Satisfactory scores 
on College Entrance Examination Board (S.A.T.) or American College 
Testing Program tests (A.C.T.) are required. 



Matriculation for Bachelor Degree Students who have completed at 
least two semesters or equivalent (30 academic credit hours) with a 
minimum quality point ratio of 2.00 may apply for matriculation for 
the Bachelor degree. 

Admission will be limited to applicants who have given evidence of 
capacity and motivation adequate for upper division work as determined 
by the department chairman. 

A cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00 is required in a 
Bachelor of Arts student's major field. 



MATRICULATION 



Biology The program prepares the student for medical, dental, veter- 
inary, or other professional training, as well as for a graduate program 
in biology and in allied health fields. Students in other disciplines, 
allied or not related, frequently choose biology as a minor area of con- 
centration. This is particularly true for those majoring in the social and 
behavioral sciences. 

For those not seeking specific professional specialization, employment 
opportunities for biologists are found in industry, federal, state, and 
municipal organizations, hospitals, research and technical laboratories, 
as well as in teaching. New employment areas are appearing where a 
knowledge of biology and a second discipline are required. Examples 
of these are Bioengineering, Psychobiology, Environmental Science, 
Pharmaceutical and Biological Sales, Management in Biological Busi- 
ness, Oceanography, Forensic Science, and many more related to 
biology, such as Pharmacology and Toxicology. 

Prospective biology majors, and those wishing to follow a Pre-Medical, 
Pre-Dental, Pre-Veterinary, or Allied Health Program, should consult 
with a member of the Biology Department before registration or during 
the first week of their first term. 

Biology majors are required to take SC 251-252, CH 105-106, M 115- 
116 or M 117-118 or M 127-128, SC 201, SC 301, PH 103-104, PH 
105106, SC 222, SC 308, SC 307 or SC 309, SC 361-362, SC 591- 
592, SC 595, and four elective courses. One year of an elementary 
language is required, plus one semester at the intermediate level 
which should be a course in scientific literature. 

Chemistry This major is offered for those students who wish to avail 
themselves of the many career opportunities in the general field of 
chemistry and also for those who wish to go on to graduate work with 
a broad liberal education and a thorough grounding in a scientific 
discipline. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



19 




AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



Career opportunities exist in the following areas: Management, tech- 
nical purchasing or sales, research, product control, production, and 
product development in the chemical, pharmaceutical, or related 
industries; analysis and research in forensic science, medicine, ocean- 
ography, and the environmental sciences; sales and product develop- 
ment in the laboratory equipment field; and teaching. 

In addition to the regular programs, a student may elect options in the 
following areas: Biology, Business, Engineering, Environmental Studies, 
Fire Science, Forensic Science, Pre-Dental, Pre-Medical, or Pre-Veter- 
inary. Courses in each option are taken instead of the normal electives. 
For details of the options, the department chairman should be con- 
sulted. 



20 



A major in Chemistry must complete the following courses: Six to 
twelve semester hours of German, Russian, French, or the equivalent, 
PH 150, 205; CH 105, 106, 211, 301, 302, 341, 401, 421, 431, 
432, 451, 452 or CH 400 elective. In addition the student is required 
to take Mathematics through M 203. 



Economics An economics major within a broad program of liberal 
studies provides a preparation for higher positions in business and 
industry today. It is also excellent preparation for graduate work in 
business administration or for graduate study in economics itself. 

Economics majors will be required to take, in addition to EC 133-134 
(Principles of Economics I and II), a total of 27 semester hours, includ- 
ing EC 336 (Money and Banking), EC 320 (Mathematical Methods in 
Economics), EC 340 (Microeconomic Analysis), EC 445 (Macroeco- 
nomic Analysis), and EC 450 (Thesis). Beyond these requirements, a 
flexible program may be devised for each major to fit the student's 
needs and interests. With the approval of the chairman or some other 
member of the department, a student may elect suitable courses in 
other departments to fulfill the semester hour requirement. 

Economics majors are required to take A 111 (Accounting), M 127 
(Finite Mathematics), and BA 216 (Statistics). 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Fire Science Administration A student earning a Bachelor's degree 
in Fire Science Administration is able to apply modern management 
techniques to the development and operation of a fire department. His 
programs include courses such as accounting, cost control, industrial 
relations, contracts and specifications, techniques of management, and 
collective bargaining. 



Fire Science is a cross disciplinary field. It adapts courses from chenn- 
istry, mathematics, accounting, business administration, industrial 
engineering, civil engineering, and, in its arson investigation courses, 
criminal justice, as well as courses in fire prevention and suppression. 

Fire Science Technology A program leading to a Bachelor's degree in 
Fire Science Technology is an upper-level two-year program, attracting 
students with degrees in fire science programs from the community 
colleges, continuing the educational development begun there. The 
stress is first of all on fire prevention. Many of the courses cover vari- 
ous engineering fields adapted to the problems that will confront the 
fire technologist. The essentials of fire chemistry, dynamics, statics, the 
way in which materials behave under various conditions of stress 
including heat, process and transportation hazards, the design of 
industrial structures and conveyances for the maximum protection of 
the worker and the public, are essential areas of study. Courses in fire 
suppression play a role almost equal to that of fire prevention. These 
include an investigation of fire suppression fluids and systems, hydrau- 
lics and thermodynamics. The student who completes this program is 
a planner, a designer of fire prevention systems, a judge of facilities 
and equipment. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



21 



Typical Fire Technology and Administration Associate Degree Program 
to be Completed at a Technical College Students desiring admission to 
the Fire Science Administration or Fire Science Technology programs 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree must have an associate degree 
in fire technology and administration as it is offered at the technical 
colleges or the equivalent. 



Professional Courses 

Intro, to Fire Technology 
Municipal Fire Administration 
Building Construction 
Industrial Processes and Hazards 

Hydraulic Technology 

Water Supply and Sprinklers 

Fire Investigation 
Fire Fighting Strategy 
Professional Electives 



Sam. 
Hrs. 

4 
2 
4 
2 
. 2 
2 
2 
2 
10-16 

30-36 



General Courses 

II 



English I, II, & 

Mathematics 

Science (Integrated Science or Physics 

and Chemistry) 
Social or Behavioral Sciences 
Electives 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

7 
6 



3-6 
30-33 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



22 



Programs at the University of New Haven 



FS 499 
FS402 

FI227 
IE 223 
IE 233 



FIRE SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION 
FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



Cr 



FS301 


Essentials of Fire 






Chemistry (same as 


CH 




331) 


3 


FS498 


Research Project 


1 


M115 


Pre-Calcuius Math, or 




M127 


Finite Math. 


3 


Alll 


Intro. Accounting 1 


3 


EC 1-33 


Prin. of Economics 1 


3 




Elective 


3 



16 



FS303 



M116 
M128 
MG125 

PH104 
PH106 
IE 105 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 
Cr 



Research Project 2 

Arson Investigation w/Lab 



(same as CH411) 
Risk and Insurance 
Personnel Administration 
Cost Control 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

17 



FS403 
PA 408 
CE407 
MG231 



Fire Protection 
Fluids and Systems 
(same as CH332) 

Survey of Calculus or 

Statistics 

Management & Organi- 
zation 

General Physics 

General Physics Lab 

Intro, to Computers or 
Elective 



Cr 



16 



Process & Transp. 
Hazards 

Collective Bargaining in 
the Public Sector 

Contracts & Specifica- 
tions 

Industrial Relations 

Electives 



Or 



B.S. Degree = 129 Semester Hours 



3 
3 

6 

18 



FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 
Cr 



Cr 



FS 301 


Essentials of Fire 


FS303 


Fire Protection 






Chemistry w/Lab 3 




Fluids & Systems 


3 


FS302 


Principles of EST w/lab 3 


FS304 


Fire Detection 




FS498 


Research Project 1 




& Control w/Lab 


3 


Ml 200 


Engineering Materials 3 


CE201 


Statics 


3 


M 117 


Calculus 1 3 


M 118 


Calculus II 


4 




Elective 3 




Elective 


3 



16 



16 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 





Cr 




FS499 


Research Project 2 


FS403 


FS402 


Arson Investigation 






v»/Lab 3 


FS404 


EE336 


Instrumentation Elec. 






w/Lab 3 


CE306 


EE223 


Principles of 


ME 301 




Electrical Engineering 3 


PH 210 


ME 204 


Dynamics 3 
Elective 3 





17 
B. S. Degree = 129 Credits 



Cr 

Process & Transp. 

Hazards w/Lab 3 

Special Hazards 

Control w/Lab 3 

Hydraulics 3 

Thermodynamics 3 

Physics III or 

Physics Elective 3 

Elective 3 

18 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



English The study of literature is at the heart of a liberal education. 
English and American literature taken together comprise one of the 
noblest monuments to man's intellect and creativity. In addition to its 
generally broadening effect, the study of literature will help the student 
to think critically and to make his writing more effective. A major in 
English is looked upon very favorably by admissions officers of law, 
medical, and dental schools. It is also good preparation for graduate 
work in such fields as business, education, urban planning, social work, 
and public health. Employers in many areas of business, industry, and 
government look favorably upon the college graduate who has both a 
rich background in literature and training in language. 

All English majors are required to take the English Literature survey 
courses (E21 1-212), and the American Literature survey courses (213- 
214). English majors also must take these courses: History of the 
English Language (302), the two courses in Shakespeare (341-342), 
and Literature of the American Renaissance (392). In addition one 
course must be taken from each of the following three groups: 

1. The Age of Chaucer (375), The Renaissance in England (323), 
English Drama to 1642 (326), The Age of Donne and Milton (362). 

2. Literature of the Neoclassic Era (371), Literature of the Romantic 
Era (353), Later Nineteenth-Century Literature (356). 

3. English Novel I (390), English Novel II (391), Modern British Lit- 
erature (361), Modern American Literature (478), Studies in Lit- 
erature (any course numbered between 481 and 498). 

While study of a foreign language is not required, it is strongly rec- 
ommended that the student who majors in English know at least one 
foreign language. Knowledge of a foreign language makes one more 
sensitive to the use and meaning of words in one's own language. Fur- 



23 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



thermore, knowledge of a foreign language widens one's perspective 
and deepens one's understanding through the insights gained into an- 
other culture. Students who are considering graduate study certainly 
should become competent in at least one foreign language. 

So that students will become familiar with another culture, the Depart- 
ment requires English majors to take at least one semester of Con- 
tinental Literature, a course that focuses on the literature of a different 
major European culture each semester it is offered. 



24 



Environmental Studies This new Bachelor program offers the student 
four options in areas of concentration beyond the common group of 
core courses. These four specialties are: Water Quality Control, Air 
Quality Control, Community Health, and Community Ecology. The first 
three are oriented towards the biological and physicti sciences, while 
the fourth is concentrated heavily in the behavioral and administrative 
sciences. Actually this latter specialty is an interdisciplinary program 
in the behavioral, biological, and physical sciences. There are increas- 
ing job opportunities for those trained in the general area of Environ- 
mental Studies as teachers, technicians, administrators, field workers, 
and as assistants to administrators in business, industry, and govern- 
ment. 




A major in one of these areas of Environmental Studies will provide the 
necessary training to enable the student to continue his education and 
training in this area by being qualified to enter a professional school 
related to a specific environmental discipline, such as a school of Public 
Health or one of Urban Ecology. 

Those students interested in one of the optional programs in Environ- 
mental Studies should consult with the chairman of the Biology Depart- 
ment before registration or during the first week of their first term. 



History The study of history provides excellent preparation for those 
seeking professional careers in public service and general administra- 
tion. This major also builds a good foundation for graduate study in 
various areas, such as law and teaching. 

All History majors will be required to take in addition to HS 111-112 
and HS 211-212 the following courses: HS 321 (History of Ancient 
Greece and Rome) or HS 317 (Renaissance and Reformation), and a 
course in Far Eastern History (HS 231 or HS 406 or HS 409). The 
major program consists of 36 hours to be determined with the advisor. 



The History Department also offers majors in specific area studies: in 
American Studies, European Studies and Economic History. A student 
who wishes to major in one of these areas should consult with the de- 
partment chairman for specific requirements. 



Mathematics The program of study in mathematics can provide a 
student with a basis for a career in industry or teaching, as well as 
for further studies in graduate school. Because mathematics is funda- 
mental to so many fields, a degree in mathematics gives one an oppor- 
tunity to diversify into areas such as engineering, physics, statistics, 
computer science, and business administration. 

A major in mathematics must complete the following courses: M 117, 
M 118, M 121, M 203, M 204, M 231, M 321, M 325. In addition 
the student must complete four 300 level or 400 level mathematics 
courses approved by the mathematics department and 12 semester 
hours of natural science or engineering selected under advisement. 



Occupational Safety and Health This program is designed to meet the 
stringent demands of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 
1970, which calls for a high level of professionalism in safety. The de- 
mands placed upon the safety professional require a broad background 
in physics, chemistry, engineering, psychology, and biology, to bring to- 
gether the knowledge required by OSHA Law. 



The program includes a diversified offering of restricted electives so as 
to provide a proper balance of flexibility to meet the needs and interests 
of individual students. The program description and course listings are 
available in a separate brochure. 

The OSHA law applies to every employer of more than one employee. 
Consequently, the demand for professionally competent people includes 
not only industry but retailing, hospitals, construction, and communi- 
cations, as well as government at all levels. In addition, there is a de- 
mand by labor unions and by State and Federal governments for en- 
dorsement administrators of this Act. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



25 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



Associate in Science — Occupational Safety and Hygiene 



26 



E 113 
P 111 
M 127 
CH 105 



IE 223 
SC 121 
SC131 
FS301 



Fall 

English Composition 

Psychology 

Finite Mathematics 

Gen. Chem. w/Lab 

Electives 

Total 



FIRST AND SECOND 

Sem. 



YEARS 



Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

16 



E206 
IE 106 
M 128 
CH 104 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

English Composition & Lit. 3 
Safety Org. & Mgt. 3 

Elementary Statistics 3 

Organic Chem. w/Lab. (108) 4 
Electives 3 

Total 16 



Personnel Administ. 3 IE 216 

Gen. Biology I 3 SC 122 

Gen. Biology Lab 1 SC 132 

Essen. Fire Chem. w/Lab 3 FS 302 

Electives 6 SO 113 

Total 16 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Elem. of Ind. Hygiene 3 

General Biology II 3 

General Biology Lab 1 

Prin. Fire Sci. Tech. w/Lab 3 

Sociology 3 

Electives 3 

Total le 



Bachelor of Science — Occupational Safety and Hygiene 

(First two years same as for Associate Degree) 




FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Environmental Chemistry 3 

Gen. Env. Health 3 

Fire Det. and Control 3 

Restricted Electives 3 

Electives 3 

Total 15 

Ind. Safety Aux. Funct. 3 

Restricted Electives 9 

Electives 7 

Total 19, 



Total — Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering: 128 Semester Hours. 

Political Science A Political Science major provides the student with 
an excellent foundation for a career in government service on the local, 
state, national, and international levels; for a career in law; for gradu- 
ate school programs in Political Science, International Relations and 
Foreign Affairs; and for careers in campaign management, communica- 
tions, public relations and business. All Political Science and pre-law 



IE 201 

SC221 
FS 303 


Fall 

Accident Cond. /Control 
Human Ecology 
Fire Prot. Fluids 
Restricted Electives 
Electives 


Sem. 
Mrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


CH 110 
SC 510 
FS304 




Total 


15 






SEVENTH AND 


EIGHTH YE/ 


ME 124 
SC301 


Mechanical Processes 
Microbiology w/Lab 
Restricted Electives 
Electives 


3 
3 
6 
3 


IE 217 




Total 


.. 15 





Political Science majors or minors should discuss career goals and pro- 
gram orientation with a departmental advisor at an early stage in order 
to select relevant courses in a total program. 

Potential Law and Graduate School students (in all disciplines) are 
urged to take special LSAT and GRE preparation courses available 
through the Political Science Department. 

A Political Science major is required to take a total of 30 semester 
hours in the Political Science Department, which must include PS 
121, 122, 261, 461, 462, and 499 or 500. All prelaw Political Science 
majors should take Introductory Accounting (A 111-112) as an elective 
and all others should take Statistics for Behavioral Science (Psychology 
301) or Statistics (Quantitative Analysis 216) as an elective to com- 
plete the major. 

The Institute of Law and Public Affairs has been established to pro- 
vide undergraduates with specific training in the areas of legal and 
public service. Students with an undergraduate major in any of the 
schools of the University can attain para-professional status in either 
Legal or Public Affairs by completing a minor in the Institute. The term 
"para-professional" applies to those with special training in a pro- 
fessional field but who do not yet possess the terminal degree normally 
required in the profession. In many instances the para-professional 
status is a step towards the accomplishment of the final degree. 

Legal Affairs The field of legal affairs prepares students for positions 
as office managers, administrative assistants, legal investigators, data 
researchers, legal library assistants, and legislative researchers in pri- 
vate and public law firms and agencies. Students acquire specific skills 
which will enable them to do important legal work under the super- 
vision of practicing attorneys. The legal affairs minor also prepares 
students for positions in the judicial system, and for research positions 
and clerkships in the law libraries of the state. 

Public Affairs The Public Affairs minor in the Institute of Law and 
Public Affairs is directed towards providing training for civil service 
positions at the governmental level. The goal of such training is to pro- 
vide more effective public administrators and to introduce creativity in- 
to the profession of public service. The Public Affairs minor will take a 
problem solving approach to the discipline as students will be conduct- 
ing basic in-depth research on problems of governmental agencies. 
Students in this minor will be able to develop valuable insights into the 
nature of the public process from the vantage point of the bureaucracy. 

Psychology Graduate study leading to the Master's degree is minimal 
for professional status in Psychology. A solid foundation for such 
graduate work is defined by a broadly-based liberal education. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



THE INSTITUTE 
OF LAW AND 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 



27 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



28 



ADC/VQ Major requirements, under advisement, include P 111, P 301, P 305, 

'•'^'-'''^ P 321, P 350 and twenty-one hours of advanced Psychology courses, 

Qp SC 121, SC 123, SO 113, PHL 111 or 124 and one college-level mathe- 

*^' matics course. Only two 200-level Psychology courses may be counted 

CTI I n Y toward the major. 

Sociology Students who wish to understand the intellectual tradition 
that has focused on the description and explanation of human society 
will be interested in a sociology major. It requires a humanistic orienta- 
tion while regarding empirical research as the major means of extend- 
ing knowledge about man. It anticipates awakening insight in predicting 
social indicators. A sociology major may continue his work in graduate 
school or he may find employment in such fields as research, govern- 
mental service, personnel work, advertising, journalism and industry. 

Major requirements are SO 113, either 114 or 214, 250, 413 and 
440, P 301 or M 128, and fifteen additional semester hours in 
sociology, at least 9 of which must be taken from the 300 level or 
above. A student may substitute 3 semester hours of SW credit for SO 
credits toward the major. SO 231, 311 and 320 are listed in other de- 
partments in the University schedules but are designated as com- 
parable sociology listings and may be used as credit toward the major. 

Social Welfare Students who wish to go into Social Work and related 
areas may take a concentration in Social Welfare. The program trains 
students to work with people, both individually and in groups, per- 
ceiving problem situations and dealing with these in a professional 
manner. Graduates must have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills 
common to the profession at the baccalaureate level. They must also 
be aware of the overall problems confronting society today and the 
position Social Work takes in response to these problems. 

There are employment opportunities in federal, state, and private 
organizations, or the student may wish to continue his education in a 
graduate school of social work. 

Major requirements are: SO 113, 114, 250, P 301 or M 128, SW 220, 
350-351, 340, 401-402, 415-416, 475. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Teacher Education The University offers a "Minor" program in Edu- 
cation to those students who wish to explore teaching as a profession 
during their undergraduate years. This service enables such students 
to broaden their knowledge of neighboring public school systems and 
to expand their opportunities should they decide on teaching as a 
career. 



The Education Minor offers several advantages: 

(a) students may elect these courses for credit toward their Bachelor's 

degree in their major fields, 

(b) these basic professional courses may be applied toward State of 

Connecticut Teaching Certification, 

(c) these Education courses may be incorporated into a graduate 
school program leading toward a Master's degree and the Per- 
manent Teaching Certificate in the State of Connecticut. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



These course requirements and those prescribed by the students' major 
department must be met by all Arts and Science students. 

Bachelor of Arts 



English and Humanities 

English Composition 
English Connposition and Literature 
•Fine Arts 
Literature 

Social Sciences 

Economics 

History, of which 3 s.h. must be either 

Western Civilization I or Western Civilization II 
Philosophy 
Psychology 
Sociology 
Political Science 
A course chosen from any Social Science department 

'Science and Mathematics 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Science Total 53-54 semester hours. 

Biology * Fine Arts includes Art. Music, and Theater. 

Mathematics **Students must elect at least one semester of 
a laboratory science with lab. 



18 s.h. 
3 
3 
6 
6 

24 s.h. 
3 
6 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

11-12 s.h. 



Fall 

E113 English Composition 

HS 111, or Western Civilization I or II 
HS 112 

Foreign Language 
Mathematics or Science 
"Elective 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

15 



Spring 

E206 English Comp. & Lit. 

History 

Foreign Language 
Mathematics or Science 
'Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



29 



CORE 

REQUIREMENTS 
BACHELOR 
PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR 
PROGRAM 

TYPICAL 

FRESHMAN 

YEAR 



' Choices should be determined by the requirements of the student's major. 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



TYPICAL 

FRESHMAN 

YEAR 



Biology SC 251-252, CH 105-106, M 115-116, M 117-118, or 
M 127-128. Omit Foreign language. Elective, and HS 111-112 in fresh- 
man year. 

Economics and History PS 121, SO 113, P 111. 

Chemistry M 117, 118, CH 105, 106, German or Russian. 

Mathematics M 117, 118, 121. 

Physics CH 105, 106, M 117, 118, PH 150, 205, German, French, or 
Russian. Omit HS 111-112 in freshman year. 

A student will be assigned an adviser in his major area before pre- 
registration for the first semester of the sophomore year. 



30 



ASSOCIATE IN 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

GENERAL STUDIES 




General Studies This major is offered for those students who wish 
a college degree of a general nature and for those students who have 
not yet decided upon a field of specialization but who, in the mean- 
time, want to start college work. 

General Studies Major first and second YEARS 







Sem. 






Sam. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


Eng. Comp. & Lit. 


3 


Pill 


Psychology 


3 


HS 111 


Western Civ. 1 




PS 121 


American Government 


3 




or 






Foreign Language or 




HS 112 


Western Civ. II 


3 




Elective 


3 


SO 113 


Sociology 


3 




'Elective 


3 




Foreign Language or 













Elective 


3 




Total 


15 




•Elective 


3 



Total 



15 



EC 133 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Foreign Language or HS 112 Western Civ. II 

Elective 3 or 

Prin. of Economics 1 3 History Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 Foreign Language or 

Science, or Math 3 Elective 3 

'Elective 3 Science, or Math 3 

— *Electives 6 

Total 15 — 

Total 15 

* Students who expect to transfer to a four-year program leading to a Bachelor degree should 
complete 12 hours of science or mathematics. 

The student is expected to carry 15 credit hours per semester. A total of 60 semester hours 
is required for the degree. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WARREN J. SMITH, DEAN 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



ACCOUNTING 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COMMUNICATION 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH PROGRAMS IN 

LAW ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION 

FORENSIC SCIENCE 

CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
ECONOMICS 
FINANCE 
HOTEL, RESTAURANT, INSTITUTIONAL 

MANAGEMENT, TOURISM AND TRAVEL 
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 
MARKETING 
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 

INCLUDING COMPUTER SCIENCE 
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
RETAILING 



Associate in Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
HOTEL ADMINISTRATION 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 
RETAILING 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



The School of Business Administration provides programs to prepare 
students for (1) several areas of business and economics, (2) the 
broad field of criminal justice, and (3) public administration. The 
courses of study combine strong professional programs with compre- 
hensive background in the liberal arts. 

The School of Business Administration considers it axiomatic that, 
over the long run, a graduate is better prepared for the business 
world when his collegiate business background has been comprehen- 
sive rather than highly specialized. Consequently, only a limited amount 
of specialization is intended in the various departmental majors. 



32 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



Accounting — is selected by those who wish to make this their career, 
including possibly ultimate attainment of the Certified Public Account- 
ant license. Accounting has long been recognized as a preferred route 
to management responsibilities in many fields of business. 

The student has the option of selecting the Financial Accounting Con- 
centration or the Managerial Accounting Concentration. 

Business Administration — is the field generally chosen by those stud- 
ents who have not yet developed their career objectives. 

Communication — The opportunities to the graduate are unlimited. A 
career field may be chosen in any one of several media. 

Economics — is a broad field in which specialists are called for by 
industry and government particularly to staff various types of research 
activities. This major is also one that would be considered by the stu- 
dent contemplating future graduate work or attendance at law school. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Finance — is one of the business disciplines that has extensive appli- 
cation to businesses generally. 

Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional iVIanagement, Tourism and Travel — 

is selected by those who wish to make this their career. There are nu- 
merous opportunities available to the graduate in the institutional field, 
restaurant management, hotel administration, and tourism. 

International Business A comparatively new field of study dealing 
with the problems of developing and adopting business practices for 
the purpose of operating within different economies, different political 
systems and different cultures. Selected by students who wish to make 
this their career. 



Management Science — this provides the student with an understanding 
of the business organization and the concepts underlying the manage- 
rial processes. The graduate has numerous opportunities available to 
him in many fields of business. 

Marketing — is a widely recognized phase of business that presents 
unmatched opportunities to the qualified graduate, depending on 
whether his interests are in the selling, managing, or analytical phases. 

Operations Management — is a growing profession. Its practices make 
increased use of quantitative analysis in the scientific management of 
business. Students with specific interest in data processing usually 
select this field. 

Personnel Management — a discipline offering excellent career oppor- 
tunities for both men and women. Majoring in personnel management 
affords the student an opportunity to obtain a solid foundation in the 
behavioral sciences within a business administration program. 

Public Administration The Public Administration program is designed 
to prepare the students for careers in public affairs (government service, 
politics), governmental research, graduate school, or to give the student 
an insight, generally, into the various governmental organizations, 
functions, and methodology which are used to both determine and 
provide the services to the people. 

On the premise that the basic skills required in managerial positions 
in public service have much in common with those of the manager 
in private industry, the student follows much the same program as 
other business students during the first two years. 

For his junior and senior years, the student majoring in Public Admin- 
istration will arrange his program under the guidance of his Depart- 
mental Chairman, so as to meet his defined objectives. A wide selection 
of courses is available in the School of Business Administration and 
the School of Engineering. 

Retailing — is selected by those who wish to make this field of business 
their career. The options available to the graduate are varied, offering 
opportunities in selling, merchandising and advertising. 

Criminal Justice Four-year bachelor degree programs in criminal 
justice are offered. They are planned for high school graduates inter- 
ested in any of the many careers in the administration and operation 
of criminal justice agencies on the federal, state, and local levels of 
government. Three programs are offered: Law Enforcement, Forensic 
Science, and Corrections. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



33 




AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



Law Enforcement This program prepares students for administrative 
careers with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies or 
public and private security forces. Law enforcement administration 
is concerned with the activities and behavior of people in terms of 
maintaining law and order, providing needed services, and protecting 
life and property. The program provides basic studies in the liberal 
arts and public administration as well as courses pertaining to law 
enforcement administration and criminal justice. 



Forensic Science This program prepares students for careers as 
forensic scientists, criminologists, or evidence technicians in the field of 
crirhinal investigation and identification. The program includes basic 
studies in the natural sciences, liberal arts, and public administration 
as well as courses in forensic science and criminal justice. 



34 



Corrections This program prepares students for administrative ca- 
reers with federal, state, local, and private correctional agencies. Cor- 
rectional administration is concerned with the institutional and non- 
institutional treatment of offenders. The program provides basic studies 
in the liberal arts and public administration as well as courses pertain- 
ing to correctional administration and criminal justice. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 




35 



The typical degree programs in the various majors follow. If a student PROGRAMS 

has special interests not provided for by these programs, an endeavor 
will be made to prepare a specific program for him (e.g. combined 
programs in Business and Chemistry). 

v The programs provided in the School of Business are divided into three 
general categories: (1) the business majors which are presented next 
below, (2) the programs in law enforcement, and (3) the program in 
public administration. 

All business students take similar core courses in business, the 
allied social sciences, and certain other liberal arts subjects. Then 
several courses are taken in the major business field selected by the 
student. The program is rounded out with electives. 

The student majoring in Business Administration may select one of MINORS 

the following minors: 

Applied Design Electrical Engineering Philosophy 

Art English Physics 

Biology History Political Science 

Chemistry Materials Engineering Psychology 

Civil Engineering Mathematics Public Administration 

Communications Mechanical Engineering Sociology 

Economics Music Appreciation 

(a) The only transfer credit that can be recognized as part of a minor 
is a course considered to be a prerequisite for the minor, (i.e. 
Pill Psychology). With the exception of the prerequisite for the 
minor that may be required in the core, the student majoring in 
the School of Business Administration will not be allowed any more 
courses than required in the specific minor field. Should he or she 
enroll for an extra course in the minor, the course will be treated 
as excess credit. Though a minor is granted because it offers a 
concentration within a discipline above the survey level, the stu- 
dent as a business major must maintain as varied a selection of 
liberal arts courses as may be available to him exclusive of elec- 
tives used to fill the minor requirements. Electives that remain 
after the student has completed his minor must be taken in other 
disciplines. 

(b) Only one minor will be recognized. 

(c) A student may change his minor. business administration 



CORE 
COURSES 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 







Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


Composition & Literature 


3 


HS112 


Western Civilization II 


3 


HS114 


Economic History of the 




LA 101 


Business Law 


3 




Western World 


3 


QA118 


Business Mathematics 1 


3 (a)(b) 


QA128 


Quantitative Techniques 


3 




Sociology or Psychology 




MK105 


Marketing 


3 




or Political Science 


3 


IE 105 


Technical Data Processing 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



36 



Alll 
EC 133 



QA216 



Intro. Accounting I 3 

Principles of Economics I 3 
Literature or Philosophy 

or Fine Arts 3 

Statistics 3(c) 

Science 3 



A 112 
EC 134 



MG 125 



Total 



15 



Intro. Accounting II 3 

Principles of Economics II 3 
Literature or Philosophy 

or Fine Arts 3 

Management & Organization 3 

Science 3 

Total 15 



Notes: (a) Subject to placement examination by the School of Business. 

(b) M 115 Mathematical Analysis I and M 116 Mathematical Analysis II may be sub- 
stituted for the QA 118 and QA 128 sequence. 

(c) Retailing, Communications, and Hotel Management majors v»ill take QA 314 Research 
Techniques in Business. 

Programs listed immediately following this page detail course requirements for third and 
fourth years only. First and second year course requirements are the same as the "Core 
Courses" listed above. Other programs have varying first and second year course require- 
ments and are listed separately near the end of the section. 




Before the end of the sophomore year a student will select a business 
major and a minor in consultation with the appropriate chairman or 
other designated advisor. The degree program for the student's third 
and fourth years will be prepared in consultation with an advisor. This 
will involve the selection of electives in addition to the required courses. 
Any University course may be used as an elective. 

Courses offered outside of the School of Business Administration or 
the Industrial Engineering Department of the School of Engineering 
shall comprise not less than 40 percent of all work taken toward 
graduation. Representative programs follow. A minimum of 120 semes- 
ter hours is required for graduation. 

The junior or senior student may be required to participate in one of 
the programs available in the School of Business Administration, such 
as the Small Business Institute or the New Products and Concepts 
Laboratory. These experiences introduce the student to the challenge 
of business realities before graduation. 



Marketing 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 

FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 







Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


RT301 


Retailing 


3 


MK316 


Sales Management 


3 


MG231 


Industrial Relations 


3 


MK302 


Industrial Marketing 


3 


MK315 


Marketing Management 


3 




Sociology or Psychology 






Electives 


6 




or Political Science 


3 











Electives 


6 



Total 



15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



Total 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



MK342 


Marketing Research 


3 


MK 107 


Advertising & Promotion 


3 


MG510 


Managerial Economics 


3 


MG 512 


Business Seminar 


3 


IB 312 


International Business 


3 




Electives 


9 




Electives 


6 






— 



15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



37 



Operations Management 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 

FIFTH AND SI)CTH YEARS 







Sem. 






Fall 


Hrs. 




IE 233 


Cost Control 


3 


IE 503 


MG231 


Industrial Relations 


3 


MG 350 


QA250 


Quantitative Analysis 


3 






Business Elective 


3 






Elective 


3 





Total 



15 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Operations Research 3 

Advanced Management 3 

Sociology or Psychology or 
Political Science 3 

Business Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



IE 508 Systems Analysis 
MG 510 Managerial Economics 

Business Elective 

Electives 



Total 



3 IE 234 Production Control 3 

3 MG 512 Seminar 3 

3 MG 550 Business Policy 3 

6 Electives 6 

15 Total 15 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Personnel Management 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 
Sem. 
Fall Mrs. 

EC 350 Economics of Labor Rel. 3 IE 201 

IE 223 Personnel Administration 3 

EC 340 Microeconomic Analysis 3 P 212 

P 111 Psychology 3 

Elective 3 MG 231 

Total 15 



Sem. 

Spring Hrs. 

Accident Conditions and 
Controls 3 

Business & Industrial 
Psychology 3 

Industrial Relations 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



38 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



MG 550 Business Policy 3 

MG 455 Organizational Effectiveness 3 
IE 106 Safety Organization 

and Management 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



Fl 227 Risk and Insurance 

IE 243 Work Analysis 
MG 512 Business Seminar 

Electives 



Total 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



Business Administration 



(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 







Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Mrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


IB 312 


International Business 


3 


Fl 227 


Risk and Insurance 


3 


Fl 113 


Finance 


3 


EC 340 


Microeconomic Analysis 


3 


MG350 


Advanced Mgt. 


3 


MK315 


Marketing Management 


3 




Sociology or Psychology 




MG 231 


Industrial Relations 


3 




or Political Science 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 






— 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



MG455 


Organizational Effectiveness 3 


MG512 


Business Seminar 


3 


MG 510 


Managerial Economics 3 


Fl 345 


Financial Institutions & 






Electives 9 




Capital Markets 


3 









Business Elective 


3 




Total 15 




Electives 


6 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Total 



15 



Economics 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 

FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



Fall 

EC 336 Money and Banking 
Economics Electives 
Electives 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
6 
6 

15 



EC 340 



Spring 

Microeconomic Analysis 
Economics Elective 
Sociology or Psychology 
or Political Science 
Electives 

Total 



Sent. 
Hn. 

3 
3 

3 
6 

15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



EC 445 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 
EC 320 Mathematical Methods in 

Economics 3 

Electives 9 

Total 15 



MG 512 Business Seminar 3 

Economics Electives 6 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



39 



Finance 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 

FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 







Sen. 






Sen. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


EC 445 


Macroeconomic Analysis 


3 


FI345 


Financial Institutions & 




Fl 113 


Finance 


3 




Capital Markets 


3 


FI214 


Real Estate 


3 


Fl 230 


Investments 


3 


A 221 


Intermediate Accounting 1 


3 


A 222 


Intermediate Accounting 


II 3 




Elective 


... 3 




Sociology or Psychology 






Total 


15 




or Political Science 
Elective 


3 
3 



Total 



15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 

EC 314 Public Finance 3 Fl 229 

MG 510 Managerial Economics 3 MG 512 

QA 333 Advanced Statistics 3 Fl 227 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



Financial Management 3 

Business Seminar 3 

Risk and Insurance 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



40 



International Business 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 







Sem. 




Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring Hrs. 


EC 342 


International Economics 


3 


MG350 


Advanced Mgt. 3 


IB 312 


International Business 


3 


IB 313 


International Marketing Mgt. 3 


FI350 


International Finance 


3 


EC 440 


Economic Development 3 




**IB Elective 


3 




**IB Elective 3 




'Elective/Language 


3 




'Elective/Language 3 



Total 



IB 415 


Comparative Management 


3 


IB 321 


Operation of the Multi- 






national Firm 


3 




Literature, Philosophy 






or Fine Arts 


3 




**IB Elective 


3 




•Elective/Language 


3 



15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 

IB 549 



Total 
'Language requirement is optional 
'*To be approved by the Chairman. 



15 



Total 15 



International Business 

Policy 3 

Psychology, Sociology or 

Political Science 3 

Literature, Philosophy or 

Fine Arts 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



Management Science 

(Following core courses listed earlier in this section) 

FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 







Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


MG324 


Development of 




IB 312 


International Business 


3 




Management Thought 


3 


MG 350 


Advanced Management 


3 


MG231 


industrial Relations 


3 


MK315 


Marketing Management 


3 


Fl 113 


Business Finance 


3 




Business Elective 


3 




Sociology or Psychology 






Elective 


3 




or Political Science 


3 











Elective 


3 




Total 


15 



Total 



15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



IB 415 


Comparative Management 


3 


MG 550 


Business Policy 


3 


MG455 


Organizational Effectiveness 


3 


MG 515 


Readings Seminar in 




MG 510 


Managerial Economics 


3 




Management 


3 




Electives 


6 


MG512 


Business Seminar 


3 











Business Elective 


3 




Total 


15 




Elective 


3 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Total 



15 



Communication 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 



E113 
PS 121 

HS112 


Fall 

English Composition 
American Government 
Psychology or Sociology 
Western Civ. II 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 


E206 

HS114 


Spring 

Comp. and Lit. 
Psychology or Sociology 
Economic History of the 
Western World 


Sem. 
Hn. 

3 

3 

3 




Science/ Math 


3 




Science/ Math 
Elective 


3 
3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



MG 125 
EC 133 
CO 101 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Management & Organization 


3 


PA 301 


Principles of Public 




Principles of Economics 1 


3 




Administration 


i 


Fundamentals of 




CO 206 


Sound Workshop 


3 


Communication 


3 


CO 102 


Problems of 




Literature or Fine Arts 


3 




Communication 


3 


Elective 


3 




Literature or Fine Arts 


3 




— 


AT 211 


Design 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



41 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



CO 210 


Film Making Theory and 




CO 220 


Film Production 


3 




Practice 


3 


PL 111 


Philosophy 


3 


CO 208 


Radio Broadcasting 


3 


SO 418 


Public Opinion and 




SO 318 


Political Sociology 


3 




Social Pressures 


3 




Restrictive Elective 


3 




Restrictive Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



P 321 Social Psychology 

QA 314 Research Techniques in 

Business 3 

Restrictive Electives 6 

Elective 3 

Total 15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 
3 



Restrictive Electives 6 

Electives 9 

Total 15 



The student w\\ take 5 courses as follows: CO 101, CO 102, CO 208, CO 210 and CO 220. In 
addition he would take 6 restricted electives determined by his advisor. The courses might be 
T. V. Production 1 and 2, Dramatic Writing, Laws of Communication, Government Regulations of 
Media, Comparative Broadcast Systems. These courses emphasize field work. The program allows 
room for a minimum of 6 elective courses. These courses could be taken from any division 
under the guidance of an advisor. They would be courses related to the student's major. Thus 
a student would have 33 hours in his major and a minimum of 18 hours of free electives. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Financial Accounting Major 

FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 



Fall 

E 113 English Composition 

QA 118 Business Mathematics I 
EC 133 Principles of Economics I 

Psychology, Sociology, or 
Political Science 

Science 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



E206 
QA 128 
EC 134 



Spring 

English Comp. & Literature 
Quantitative Techniques 
Principles of Economics II 
Science 

Psychology, Sociology, or 
Political Science 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



42 



A 111 Introductory Accounting I 3 

LA 101 Business Law I 3 

QA 216 Statistics 3 

HS 112 Western Civilization II 3 

MG 125 IVIanagement & Organization 3 

Total 15 



A 112 
LA 102 
MK 105 
IE 105 

HS 114 



Introductory Accounting II 3 

Business Law/ II 3 

Marketing 3 
Introduction to 

Computers/COBOL 3 
Economic History of the 

Western World 3 

Total 15 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



A 221 Intermediate Accounting 

A 223 Cost Accounting I 

Fl 113 Business Finance 

Literature, Philosophy, or 
Fine Arts 

Elective 

Total 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



A 222 
A 224 
Fl 230 



Intermediate Accounting II 3 

Cost Accounting II 3 

Investments 3 
Literature, Philosophy, or 

Fine Arts 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



A 331 


Advanced Accounting 1 


3 


A 332 


Advanced Accounting II 


3 


A 333 


Auditing 1 


3 


A 334 


Auditing II 


3 


A 335 


Income Tax Procedures 1 


3 


A 336 


Income Tax Procedures II 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



UN(VERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Criminal Justice — 

Correctional Administration Major 



CJ 408 
IE 105 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 







Sem. 






Fall 


Hrs. 




CJ 101 


Intro, to Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ 102 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


SO 113 


Sociology 


3 


CJ 104 


P 111 


Psycfiology 


3 




PS 121 


American Government 


3 


CJ 107 



Total 



15 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Spring 

Criminal Law 

English Comp. & Literature 

Intro, to Police & Law 

Enforcement 
Intro, to Corrections . 
Restricted Elective— Math 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 



3 
3 
3 

15 



CJ205 


Interpersonal Relations 


3 


CJ218 


Criminal Procedures II 




CJ 209 


Correctional Treatment 






& Evidence 


3 




Programs 


3 


SO 250 


Research Methods 


3 


CJ217 


Criminal Procedures 1 


3 


P315 


Psychology of Learning 


3 


CJ221 


Juvenile Delinquency 


3 


PS 122 


State and Local Govern- 






Science Elective w/Lab 


4 




ment and Politics 


3 











Science Elective w/Lab 


4 




Total 


16 




Total 


16 




FIFTh 


1 AND 


SIXTH YEARS 






CJ 300 


History of Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ 301 


Group Dynamics in Criminal 




CJ 302 


Behaviorism: Applications in 






Justice 


3 




Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ 309 


Probation and Parole 


3 


PA 301 


Public Administration 


3 


CJ 311 


Criminology 


3 


PS 332 


Constitutional Law 


3 


IE .^6 


Statistical Analysis 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 


P336 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 



Total 



15 
SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



Total 15 



Correctional Counseling 
Introduction to 

Computers/COBOL 
Restricted Elective 
Restricted Elective 
Elective 

Total 



3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



CJ 501 
IE 507 



Internship or Restricted 

Elective 3 

Systems Analysis 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 



TOTAL: 122 Semester Hours. 



Day courses offered by the Department of Criminal Justice on the main campus m West 
Haven meet either on Tuesday and Thursday or Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Evening 
courses offered on the main campus meet one evening each week from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. 
Extension courses conducted in Norwalk, New London, and Plainville generally meet one 
evening each week from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. 

However, a number of courses conducted on the main campus and extension courses in 
Norwalk, New London, and Plainville are offered on a special basis one day each week. Under 
this arrangement, the course meets one morning each week from 9:00 to 11:45 a.m. and 
again the same evening from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. Students may attend either lecture that week 
depending upon their work schedule. 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



43 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



44 



Crimina 
Forensic 

E 113 
CJ 101 
SC 121 
SC 131 
SC 135 
CH 105 


1 Justice — 
; Science Major 

FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 
Sem. 
Fall Hrs. 

English Composition 3 E 206 
Intro, to Criminal Justice 3 CJ 102 
Biology 1 3 CJ 104 
Biology Lab. 1 1 
Earth Sciences 3 SC 123 
General Chemistry 1 w/Lab. 4 SC 132 
— CH 106 
Total 17 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

General Physics 1 3 PH 104 
General Physics Lab. 1 1 PH 106 
Finite Mathematics 3 M 128 
Organic Chem. w/Lab. 4 CH :^02 
Prin. of Criminal Invest. 3 CJ 215 
Evidence 3 SO 113 


Spring 

English Comp. & Literature 
Criminal Law 
Intro, to Police & 

Law Enforcement 
Human Biology 
Biology Lab II 


Sem. 

Hrs. 
3 
3 

3 
3 
1 


PH 103 
PH 105 
M 127 
CH 301 
CJ 201 
CJ 219 


General Chemistry II w/Lab. 
Total 

General Physics II 
General Physics Lab. II 
Elementary Statistics 
Organic Chem. w/Lab. 
Intro, to Forensic Science 
Sociology 


4 
17 

3 

1 
3 
4 
3 
3 



Total 



17 



Total 



17 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 

CJ 300 History of Criminal Justice 3 CJ 311 

P 111 Psychology 3 CJ 304 

CJ 303 Forensic Science Lab. I 3 SC 503 

SC 303 Histology w/Lab. 4 SC 362 

CH211 Quant. Analysis w/Lab. 4 SC 320 

Total 17 



Criminology 3 

Forensic Science Lab. II 3 

Pathology w/Lab. 4 

Biochemistry II w/Lab. 4 

Forensic Medicine 3 

Total 17 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



CH 351 Qual. Org. Chem. w/Lab. 
SC 304 Immunology & Serology 

w/Lab. 
SC 519 Pharmacology w/Lab. 
SC 515 Biophysics I 



Total 



4 
4 
3 

15 



CH 341 

SC521 
SC509 

PH 201 



Instrumental Methods of 

Analysis w/Lab. 4 

Toxicology w/Lab. 4 

Scientific Photographic 

Documentation 3 

Tech. in Nuclear Physics 2 

Total 13 



TOTAL: 130 Semester Hours 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Criminal Justice — 

Law Enforcement Administration 



lajor 



CJ201 

CJ 205 
CJ 217 
CJ221 



CJ300 
PA 301 
PS 332 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 







Sem. 






Fall 


Hrs. 




CJ 101 


Intro, to Criminal Justice 


3 


CJ 102 


E113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


SO 113 


Sociology 


3 


CJ 104 


Pill 


Psychology 


3 




PS 121 


American Government 


3 


CJ 107 



Total 



15 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Principles of Criminal CJ 215 

Investigation 3 CJ 218 

Interpersonal Relations 3 

Criminal Procedures I 3 SO 250 

Juvenile Delinquency 3 

Science Elective w/Lab. 4 

Total 16 - 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 

History of Criminal Justice 3 CJ 301 

Public Administration 3 

Constitutional Law 3 CJ 311 

Restricted Elective 3 P 336 

Elective 3 IE 346 

Total 15 



Sem. 
Spring Hn. 

Criminal Law 3 

English Comp. & Literature 3 
Intro, to Police & Law 

Enforcement 3 

Intro, to Corrections 3 

Restricted Elective — Math 3 



Total 



15 



Intro, to Forensic Science 3 
Criminal Procedures II 

& Evidence 3 

Research Methods 3 

Science Elective w/Lab. 4 

Elective 3 

Total 16 



Group Dynamics in Criminal 

Justice 
Criminology 
Abnormal Psychology 
Statistical Analysis 
Elective 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



CJ 402 


Police-Community-Relations 


3 


CJ 501 


Internship or Restricted 




IE 105 


Introduction to 






Elective 


3 




Computers/COBOL 


3 


IE 507 


Systems Analysis 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 




Restricted Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 



Total 



15 
TOTAL: 122 Semester Hours 



Total 



15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



45 



Associate Degree Programs Successful completion of the first two 
years of one of the programs offered by the Department of Criminal 
Justice with a minimum quality point average of 2.00 qualifies the 
student for the Associate in Science in either Law Enforcement Admin- 
istration, Forensic Science, or Correctional Administration. 



ASSOCIATE 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Hotel, Restaurant, Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 







Sem. 




Sent, 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring Hrt. 


E 113 


English Composition 


3 


E220 


Report Writing 3 


HM 101 


Laws of Inn-keeping 


3 


MG 105 


Marketing 3 


HM 103 


Principles of Hotel 




HM 104 


Procedures & Techniques in 




Management 


3 




Hotel Management 3 




Math 


3 




Math 3 




Sociology or Psychology or 




IE 105 


*lntro. to Computers (COBOL) 3 




Political Science 


3 




— 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



46 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



A 111 


Introductory Accounting 1 


3 


A 112 


Introductory Accounting II 


3 


EC 133 


Principles of Economics 1 


3 


MK 107 


Advertising & Promotion 


3 




•'Science 


3 




"Science 


3 


Fl 113 


Business Finance 


3 


HM 150 


Management Decision 




HM 165 


Tourism 


3 




Making 


3 






— 


MG 125 


Management & Organization 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



HM302 


Purchasing & Control 


3 


A 342 


Management Accounting 


3 


Fl 227 


Risk & Insurance 
Literature or Philosophy or 


3 


Fl 230 


Investments 

Sociology or Psychology or 


3 




Fine Arts 


3 




History 


3 




Hotel Management Elective 


3 




Hotel Management Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective or Foreign 








— 




Language 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



EC 350 Economics of Labor 

Relations 3 

MK 316 Sales Management 3 

Hotel Management Elective 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



HM 512 Seminar in Hotel 

Management 3 

HM411 Analysis of Design Systems 3 

Hotel Management Elective 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



* Students may Substitute HM 410. 
** SC 115-116 Biology is recommended. 

Hotel Management Electives are to be chosen from the areas of Hotel Administration, Restau- 
rant Management, Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel. 



Managerial Accounting 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 







Sem. 






Sem 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


E 113 


English Composition 


3 


E206 


English Composition & 




QA118 


Business Mathematics 1 


3 




Literature 


3 


EC 133 


Principles of Economics 1 


3 


QA 128 


Quantitative Techniques 


3 




Psychology, Sociology, or 




EC 134 


Principles of Economics II 


3 




Political Science 


3 




Science 


3 




Science 


3 




Psychology, Sociology, or 
Political Science 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

A 111 Introductory Accounting 13 A 112 

LA 101 Business Law I 3 MK 105 

QA 216 Statistics 3 IE 105 

HS 112 Western Civilization II 3 

MG 125 Management & Organization 3 HS 114 

Total 15 



Introductory Accounting II 3 

Marketing 3 
Introduction to 

Computers/COBOL 3 
Economic History of the 

Western World 3 
Literature, Philosophy, or 

Fine Arts 3 

Total 15 



47 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



A 221 
A 223 
Fl 113 



Intermediate Accounting 
Cost Accounting I 
Business Finance 
Literature, Philosophy, 

or Fine Arts 
Elective 



Total 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



A 222 
A 224 
Fl 229 
MG 350 



Intermediate Accounting 
Cost Accounting II 
Financial Management 
Advanced Management 

Theory 
Elective 



Total 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



Total 



15 



Total 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

15 



A 335 


Income Tax Procedures 1 


3 


A 336 


Income Tax Procedures II 


3 


A 333 


Auditing 1 


3 


A 339 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


A 331 


Advanced Accounting 1 


3 


MG510 


Managerial Economics 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 




Elective 


3 



15 




BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Public Administration 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 



Fall 

E 113 English Composition 

'Science 

Matli 

Sociology or Psychology 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



E206 
EC 300 



IE 105 



Spring 

Composition & Literature 
Economic History of 

the U. S. 
'Science 

Math 

Introduction to 
Computers/COBOL 

Total 



Sem. 
Hre. 

3 

3 
3 
3 



15 



48 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Alll 


Introductory Accounting 1 


3 


A 114 


EC 133 


Principles of Economics 1 


3 


EC 134 


PS 121 


American Government 


3 




QA314 


Research Techniques in 








Business 


3 


PS 216 


LA 101 


Business Law 


3 


MG 125 



Total 



15 



Municipal Accounting 3 

Principles of Economics II 3 
Literature or Philosophy 

or Fine Arts 3 

Urban Government 3 

Management & Organization 3 

Total 15 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



PA 301 


Public Administration 


3 


PA 302 


Procedures in Public Admin. 


3 


EC 314 


Public Finance 


3 


PA 390 


Administrative Law 


3 




Electives 


9 


PA 307 


Urban & Regional Problems 


3 






— 




Electives 


6 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



PA 408 Collective Bargaining in the 

Public Sector 3 

PA 320 Municipal Finance and 

Budgeting 3 

Electives 9 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 

PA 490 



PA 512 



Prin. & Practices of Public 

Health Administration 3 

Seminar in Public Admin. 3 

Electives 9 



Total 15 

' SC 121-122 Biology with lab. is recommended. 

TOTAL: 120 Semester Hours 



Total 



15 



Retailing 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 



E113 
HS112 
LA 101 


Fall 

English Composition 
Western Civilization II 
Business Law 1 
Math 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 


E206 
HS114 

MK 105 


Spring 

Composition & Literature 
Economic History of the 

Western World 
Principles of Marketing 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 
3 




Sociology, Psychology or 
Political Science 


3 


IE 105 


Math 

Introduction to 
Computers/COBOL 


3 
3 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



A 111 Introductory Accounting I 

EC 133 Principles of Economics I 
MK 107 Advertising & Promotion 
QA 314 Research Techniques in 
Business 
Science 

Total 15 



3 


A 112 


Introductory Accounting II 


3 


3 


EC 134 


Principles of Economics II 


3 


3 


RT 121 


Retailing 


3 




MG 125 


Management & Organization 


3 


3 
3 




Science 


3 



Total 



15 



49 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



RT209 


Retail Advertising & Sales 




RT215 


Retail Credit Management 


3 




Promotion 


3 


RT213 


Furniture & Apparel 




RT212 


Textiles 


3 




Accessories 


3 


MG231 


Industrial Relations 


3 


w 


Sociology, Psychology, or 






Electives 


6 




Political Science 


3 











Electives 


6 



Total 



15 



Total 



15 



RT303 



MG510 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



Fashions in Retailing 


3 


RT310 


Literature, Philosophy or 




MG 512 


Fine Arts 


3 




Managerial Economics 


3 




Electives 


6 





Total 



15 



Retail Merchandise Mgmt. 3 

Seminar 3 

Internship 3 

Electives 6 



Total 



15 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

THOMAS C WARNER, JR., DEAN 



Bachelor of Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS ENGINEERING 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 



Associate in Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

ENGINEERING SCIENCE 
ENGINEERING 
AERONAUTICAL TECHNOLOGY 



ENGINEERING 



An applicant for admission to the Engineering Programs should be a 
graduate of a secondary school of approved standing and should 
present 15 acceptable units of secondary school work. These should 
include 4 units of English, 2 units of algebra, 1 of plane geometry, 
1/2 of trigonometry, and 1 unit each of physics and a second science. 
Deficiencies in English, mathematics, and/or science may be satisfied 
by summer school attendance, or by an extension of the stated curricu- 
lum for one or two semesters chosen to fit the student's need. 



ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS 



Satisfactory placement in tests covering scholastic aptitude, mathe- 
matics, and English, as given by the College Entrance Examination 
Board (S.A.T.) or American College Testing Program (A.C.T.), is 
required. 



52 



MATRICULATION 



Matriculation for Bachelor's Degree Students who have completed at 
least two semesters or equivalent (30 academic credit hours) with a 
minimum quality point ratio of 2.00 may apply for matriculation for 
the Bachelor's degree. 



Admission will be limited to applicants who have given evidence of 
capacity and motivation adequate for upper division work as deter- 
mined by the chairman of the department. 

A cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00 is required in a 
Bachelor of Science student's major field. 



Professional Accreditation The School of Engineering's Civil, Electri- 
cal, Industrial and Mechanical Engineering curricula are accredited 
by the Engineers' Council for Professional Development (ECPD). 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: The continued 
rapid growth of the nation's and the world's economies requires the 
expenditure of billions of dollars annually for the design and construc- 
tion of new facilities for commercial, industrial, institutional, and resi- 
dential buildings, transportation systems of all types, water supply, 
and sanitary engineering projects. A major area for future develop- 
ment is pollution control of all types; Civil Engineers will play an im- 
portant role in this field. The student is exposed to these and other 
areas and, upon the completion of the prescribed four-year curriculum, 
receives the Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering. 



Electrical Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: Electrical En- 
gineering is fundamentally concerned with energy and information. The 
principles of electrical phenomena are applied to the generation, dis- 
tribution and control of energy. Information systems including com- 
puters, radio and television communications systems, as well as ap- 
paratus for data processing, are a result of the application of electrical 
phenomena to specific tasks. Examples abound of these activities and 
include the nuclear power plant, the high voltage transmission line, 
the automated manufacturing plant, the digital computer, and the satel- 
lite communications system. 

The principle function of the graduate Electrical Engineer is to design 
apparatus and systems. He often develops new concepts and proced- 
ures by applying well established design principles to new situations or 
by the discovery of basic phenomena having immediate technological 
application. There are many instances in which a whole new technology 
has risen from a successful research effort. The electronic hand calcu- 
lator, for example, is the result of design and fabrication techniques 
that have been developed only within the recent past. The integrated 
circuitry in the hand calculator is equivalent to tens of thousands of dis- 
crete transistors. 

An undergraduate program in Electrical Engineering must prepare the 
student for a professional career that will extend over a time span in 
excess of forty years after graduation. Consequently, in a field where 
new developments occur at a continuous and rapid rate, it is impera- 
tive that the new graduate be thoroughly trained in basic principles 
which do not change and which form the foundation of Electrical En- 
gineering. The program of studies at the University of New Haven in- 
cludes a balanced concentration on basic engineering analysis and de- 
sign principles. Modern applications of these techniques are presented 
in our laboratory and design courses. Since the origins of engineering 
methods are based in the sciences of Chemistry, Mathematics, and 
Physics, courses in these areas are an important part of the program. 

The digital computer is of great importance in engineering for analysis 
and design. Electrical Engineering students become competent in the 
use of computers for numerical applications and optimizing engineer- 
ing design. The computer is also studied as an element in a system 
where it is used to monitor and control complex industrial processes. 

Electrical Engineering students should possess good analytical abilities 
including sound mathematical competence. They should also have a 
natural curiosity about the multitude of technical devices encountered 
in everyday life, a willingness to learn the principles that make these 
devices possible, and a desire to create new devices and methods of 
solving problems. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 



53 



ENGINEERING 



54 



AREAS ndustnal Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: The study of 

Industrial Engineering prepares a student for a successful career in 

Qt the manufacturing, research, and service industries. Based as it is on a 

OTi ir>\/ P'^°^'^ engineering background, the professional program taken in the 

oTUDY -^^ ^*° ^^^""^ °^®''^ ^ perspective Vi^hich enables the graduate to cope 

with complex problem situations encountered in modern industry. 

Special attention is given to preparing the student for the intelligent 

use of computers in modern industrial practice. Upon satisfactory 

completion of the prescribed four-year curriculum, graduates will 

receive the Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering. 

Materials Engineering Bachelor of Science Program: Materials En- 
gineering is the systematic control of material properties such as 
strength, electrical conductivity, and corrosion resistance, through the 
understanding of the internal microscopic structure of materials. 
Practically every product, tool, machine, or building is constructed 
with careful attention paid to the materials from which it is made. 
Concrete must withstand years of heat and extreme cold. Plastics 
change dramatically with temperature. Rubber compounds support 
every automobile occupant. Metal parts must withstand heat, tension, 
compression, and fatigue. Each design and fabrication is a critical 
process. Materials Engineers are therefore respected experts whose 
decisions on quality, safety, and materials selection are of vital con- 
cern to airlines, government laboratories, steel mills, tire manufac- 
turers, and atomic energy installations. 

Mechanical Engineering. Bachelor of Science Program: The tre- 
mendously broad field of Mechanical Engineering requires a common 
core of fundamental knowledge which is obtained in the required 
courses in this major. Upon the completion of these required courses, 
the student, in consultation with his faculty advisor, selects restricted 
electives which will give him advanced courses in his area of greatest 
interest. Upon satisfactory completion of the prescribed four-year cur- 
riculum, graduates will receive the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Computer Technology The program in computer technology is de- 
signed to produce a graduate who has the ability to take control of a 
computer complex. Programming in several languages, and the organi- 
zation and association of computer machinery are treated in depth. A 
strong base in mathematics, physics and general business techniques 
and practices enables the graduate to work intelligently in either a busi- 
UNivERsiTY OF NEW HAVEN HBSs or engineering environment. 



Associate in Science This program provides students with the first 
two years of a standard four-year engineering program. Since the 
University of New Haven's courses are fully accredited, the student will 
be in a position to transfer with advanced standing to the four-year 
Bachelor program, to the Evening Credit Division of the University, 
or to another institution. Upon satisfactory completion of the pre- 
scribed two-year curriculum in any Engineering major for the Bachelor 
of Science degree, graduates may receive the Associate in Science in 
Engineering Science degree. 



A degree of Associate in Science in Engineering is described in the 
Evening Division Bulletin. This program provides maximum flexibility 
in course requirements for the student who desires to terminate his 
studies with the Associate degree. 



Aeronautical Technology An Associate in Science degree in Aeronau- 
tical Technology is now being offered. The objective of this program is 
to provide students interested in a career as a general aviation pilot or 
as a worker in the aerospace field with college level training in aviation 
and the related technologies. Since there is an increasing demand for 
specialists with higher degrees in this field, the program is being or- 
ganized to incorporate the basic prerequisites to facilitate the trans- 
ferring of its graduates into one of the Bachelor of Science programs in 
technology. Details of the program will be furnished upon request. 



AREAS 

OF 

STUDY 




Interdisciplinary Programs The following programs offered in con- 
junction with the School of Business will be found in other sections of 
the catalog. 

Criminal Justice — Law Enforcement Administration major 
Criminal Justice — Correctional Administration major 
Business Administration — Operations Management major. 

The following programs offered in conjunction with the School of Arts 
and Sciences will be found in other sections of the catalog. 

Occupational Safety and Hygiene 
Fire Science Technology 

In addition, students in a Liberal Arts or Business major may elect a 
minor in an Engineering discipline. It is also possible for students ma- 
joring in Engineering to elect a minor in other disciplines. For details 
see the Chairmen of the departments involved. 



ENGINEERING 



BACHELOR 

OF 

SCIENCE 



The Bachelor of Science program in the various Engineering majors 
contains a common First Two Years with minor variations in the Third 
and Fourth Years. Students in Engineering should choose their major 
by the beginning of the Third and Fourth Years. Students who are ac- 
cepted with deficiencies must remove them before entering the Third 
and Fourth Years. 



COMMON FIRST TWO YEARS 



CORE 

FIRST TWO 

YEARS 



56 



E113 
'M115 
HS121 
ES107 
■CH 103 

CHIOS 



Sem. 
Fall Hrs. 

English Composition 3 

Mathematical Analysis I 3 

History of Science 3 

Introduction to Engineering 3 
Introduction to General 

Chemistry or 3 

General Chemistry I (4) 



E201 
M117 
IE 102 
PH 150 
CHllO 



Sem. 

Spring Hrs. 

World Literature I 3 

Calculus I 4 

Introduction to Computers 3 

Mech/Heat/Waves 4 

Environmental Chemistry 3 

Total 17 



Total 



15(16) 



'Students with sufficient preparation will be placed in Course M 117, and will take Course 

M 118 in the Spring Semester. 

■'Students will be placed in the appropriate course based on their preparation in Chemistry. 
'In lieu of PE 111 and PE 112 students may elect to take course PE 100 as their free elective 

in the Junior or Senior Year for 3 Semester Hours credit. 







Civil Engineering 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 







Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


M 118 


Calculus II 


4 


M 203 


Calculus III 


4 


E202 


World Literature II 


3 


CE202 


Mechanics of Materials 1 


3 


PH205 


Electromagnetism & 




ME 101 


Engineering Graphics 


3 




Optics w/Lab. 


4 


ME 204 


Dynamics 


3 


CE201 


Statics 


3 




Elective, Science 


3 


IE 204 


Engineering Economics 


3 









Total 



17 



Total 



16 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 





FIFTH 


AND 


SIXTH YEARS 






M 204 


Differential Equations 


3 


CE302 


Buildmg Construction 


3 


EC 133 


Principles of Economics 1 


3 


'CE 303 


Steel Design & Construe, or 


CE203 


Surveying 1 


3 


-CE 306 


Hydraulics 


3 


CE301 


Transportation Engrg. 


3 


CE304 


Soil Mechanics 


3 


'CE312 


Structural Analysis 1 or 




EE336 


Electrical Engrg. Systems 


3 


=CE315 


Environmental Engrg. and 






Elective, Math 


3 




Sanitation 


3 








EE201 


Basic Cir./Num. Methods 


3 




Total 


15 



Total 



18 



57 





SEVENTH AND 


EIGHTH YEARS 




'CE 314 

■CE 402 
CE407 
ME 301 


Concrete Design & 
Construction or 
Water Supply & Power 
Contracts & Specifications 
Thermodynamics 1 
Elective, Restricted 
Elective, General Stud. 
Elective, Free 

Total 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 


'CE 405 
=CE 404 
CE501 


Indeterminate Structures or 
Sanitary Engineering 
Design Project 
Electives, Restricted 
Elective, General Studies 

Total 



3 
3 
6 
3 

15 



Options and Selection of Electives 

A student may, by taking courses identified with (1), plus properly selected Restricted Electives, 
concentrate in the area of Structures. Similarly, a student may concentrate in the field of 
Sanitary Engineering by taking courses identified with (2), plus properly selected Restricted 
Electives. A balanced program may be achieved by taking courses identified with (1) and (2), 
utilizing 3 Restricted Electives and 1 Free Elective. Students should consult with the Chairman 
of the Civil Engineering Department prior to the Third Year, in order to plan his program. 
TOTAL— Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering: 128 to 132 Semester Hours. 



ENGINEERING 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Electrical Engineering 
















THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 






EE201 
PH 205 
CE205 
M 118 
E 202 


Fall 

Circuits/Num. Mthds. 
Electro/Optics w/Lab. 
Statics/Strength of Mtis 
Calculus II 
World Literature II 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
4 
4 
4 
3 


EE202 
EE 253 
ME 204 
M 203 


Spring 

Network Analysis 1 
EE Lab 1 
Dynamics 

Calculus III 

Elective, Physics 


Sem 
Hrs. 

3 
2 
3 

4 

3 



Total 



18 



Total 



15 



58 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



EE301 


Network Analysis II 


3 


EE 302 


Systems Analysis 


3 


EE347 


Electronics 1 


3 


EE363 


Energy Conversion 


3 


EE355 


Digital Systems 1 


3 


EE348 


Electronics II 


3 


EE 361 


Electromagnetic Theory 


3 


EE349 


EE Lab. II 


2 


M 204 


Differential Equations 


3 




Elective, Math 


3 











Elective, Tech. 1 


3 



Total 



15 



Total 



17 






SEVENTH AND 


EIGHTH YEARS 






EE420 


Stat. Systems Anal. 


3 


IE 204 


Engineering Economics 


3 


EE453 


EE Lab. Ill 


2 




Elective, Tech. Ill 


3 


EE462 


Electromagnetic Waves 


3 




Elective, Tech. IV 


3 


EC 133 


Principles of Economics 1 


3 




Elective, Gen. Studies 


3 




Elective, Tech. II 


3 




Elective, Free 


3 




Elective, Gen, Studies 


3 













— 




Total 


15 



Total 



17 



Selection of Electlves 

Technical electives must be selected with the consultation of the advisor and approval of the 
Department Chairman. Generally, technical electives must be junior or senior level courses in 
the areas of engineering, mathematics or physics. 
TOTAL— Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering: 126-130 Semester Hours. 



Industrial Engineering 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Sem. 
Fall Hrs. 

M 118 Calculus II 4 

PH 205 Electromagnetism & 

Optics v»/Lab, 4 

CE 201 Statics 3 

E202 World Literature II 3 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 3 

Total 17 



M 203 
CE202 
ME 204 
ME 101 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Calculus III 4 

Mechanics of Materials I 3 
Dynamics 3 

Engineering Graphics 3 

Elective, Physics 3 

Total 16 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



M204 


Differential Equations 
or 




EC 133 
EC 350 


Princ. of Economics 1 
Economics of Labor 


3 


M231 
IE 224 

IE 243 
IE 346 
IE 214 


Linear Algebra 
Advanced FORTRAN 

Programming 
Work Analysis 
Statistical Analysis 
Management Theory 


3 

3 
3 
3 
3 


IE 234 
IE 502 


Relations 
Production Control 
Operations Research 
Elective, Tech. 1 
'Elective, Math 

Total 


i 
3 
3 
3 
3 

18 



Total 



15 



59 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



IE 233 
EE201 


Cost Control 
Circuits/Numer. Methods 
Elective, General Stud. 
Elective, Tech. II 
Elective, Free 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


IE 443 
IE 504 
EE336 


Facilities Planning 
Laboratory Thesis 
Electrical Engineering 

Systems 
Elective, General Stud. 
Electives, Tech. Ill & IV 


3 
3 

3 
3 
6 




Total 


15 




Total 


,.. 18 



*IE 347 Probability Analysis or any 300 or 400 series math course. 

Selection of Electives 

Technical electives must be selected with the consultation of the advisor and approval of the 
Department Chairman. Generally, technical electives must be junior or senior level courses In 
the areas of engineering, mathematics or physics. 
TOTAL— Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering: 128-132 Semester Hours. 



ENGINEERING 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



Materials Engineering 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Fall 

M 118 Calculus II 

CH 105 General Chemistry I 
MT 219 Physical Metallurgy 
ME 101 Engineering Graphics 
E 202 World Literature II 

Total 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

4 
4 
3 
3 
3 

17 





Sem. 


Spring 


Hrs. 


M 203 Calculus III 


4 


PH 205 Electro/Optics w/Lab. 


4 


MT 309-310 Materials Laboratory 


3 


EC 133 Principles of Economics 


3 


Elective, Chemistry 


(3) 4 



Total 



(17) 18 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



60 



M 204 Differential Equations 3 

MT 331 Non-Ferrous Metallurgy 3 

CE 201 Statics 3 

ME 301 Thermodynamics 3 

Elective, Physics 3 

Total 15 



MT220 
MT 304 

CE 202 
EE201 
ME 204 



Electronic Materials 3 
Mechanical Behavior 

of Materials 3 

Mechanics of Materials I 3 

Circuits/Numerical Methods 3 

Dynamics 3 

Elective, General Studies 3 

Total 18 



SE\rtNTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 




MT 342 Steels & Their Heat 

Treatment 3 
EE 336 Electrical Engineering 

Systems 3 

IE 204 Engineering Economics 3 

Elective, Materials 3 

Elective, Free 3 

Total 15 



MT 500 



Research 


Project 


3 


Elective, 


Materials 


3 


Elective, 


Restricted 


3 


Elective, 


Restricted 


3 


Elective, 


General Studies 


3 



Total 



15 



Selection of Electlves 

Each student will meet v^ith the Chairman of the Materials Engineering Department during the 
Spring term of his second year to select the restricted electives which will result in a program 
of maximum benefit to the student. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science degree in Materials Engineering: 123-130 Semester Hours. 



Mechanical Engineering 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Sem. 

Fall Mrs. 

M 118 Calculus II 4 M 203 

PH 205 Electro/Optics w/Lab. 4 ME 101 

E 202 World Literature II 3 ME 204 

CE 201 Statics 3 CE 202 

EE 201 Circuits/Num. Methods 3 EE 336 

Total 17 



Sem. 

Spring Mrs. 

Calculus III 4 

Engineering Graphics 3 

Dynamics 3 

Mechanics of Materials I 3 

Electrical Engrg. Systems 3 

Total 16 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



ME 301 
ME 307 
M 204 
MT200 
ME 311 


Thermodynamics 1 

Mech. of Materials II 
Differential Equations 
Engineering Materials 

Machine Elements 

Elective, Free 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
... 3 


ME 302 
ME 315 
ME 321 
ME 344 


Thermodynamics II 
M. E. Lab. 1 
Fluid Mechanics 
Mechanics of Vibration 
Elective, Math 
Elective, Physics 


3 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 




Total 


18 




Total 


17 




SEVENTH AND 


EIGHTH YEARS 






ME 312 
ME 322 
EC 133 


Mechanical Design or 
Intro, to Gas Dynamics 
Princ. of Economics 1 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Electives, Tech. 1 & II 


3 
3 
3 
6 


ME 404 
ME 406 
ME 415 
IE 204 


Heat & Mass Transfer 
Turbomachinery 
M. E. Lab. II 
Engineering Economics 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Elective, Tech. Ill 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Total 



15 



Total 



18 



Selection of Electives 

Technical Electives must be selected with the consultation of the advisor and approval of the 
Department Chairman. Generally, technical electives will be chosen from the following courses: 
ME 312, ME 322, ME 343, ME 401, ME 403, ME 408 and ME 512. 
TOTAL— Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering: 129-133 Semester Hours. 



61 




r'^r^Pi^^ 




BACHELOR 


Computer Technology 










DEGREE 






FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 






PROGRAMS 


■M 115 
E 113 
HS 121 
ES 107 
IE 105 


Fall 

Math Analysis 1 
English Composition 
History of Science 
Intro, to Engineering 
Intro, to Computers: 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
COBOL 3 


M 117 
E201 
PH 150 

IE 104 
IE 205 


Spring 

Calculus 1 

World Lit. 1 
Mech., Heat, Waves 

w/Lab. 
Comp. Sys. Design 
Adv. COBOL Prog. 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

4 

3 

4 
3 
3 



Total 



15 



Total 



17 



62 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



M 118 


Calculus II 


4 


IE 214 


IE 102 


Intro, to Comp. FORTRAN 


3 


IE 224 


PH205 


Electromagnetism & 




IE 346 




Optics w/Lab. 


4 


IE 204 


E202 


World Literature II 


3 


ME 101 


EC 133 


Princ. of Economics 1 


3 





Total 



17 



Management Theory 3 

Adv. FORTRAN Prog. 3 

Statistical Analysis 3 

Engineering Economics 3 

Engineering Graphics 3 

Total 15 



FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



IE 234 


Production Control 


3 


IE 334 


Assembler Language 


3 


IE 332 


PL/I and RPG 


3 


IE 336 


Hardware Operation 


3 


IE 231 


Terminal & Remote Job 




IE 502 


Operations Research 


3 




Entry Systems 


3 


E 220 


Writing for Bus. & Ind. 


3 


EC 350 


Econ. of Labor Relations 


3 


EE356 


Digital Sys. II 


3 


EE355 


Digital Systems 1 


3 






— 











Total 


Ih 



Total 



15 



IE 233 
IE 320 
IE 325 
P 111 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 

Cost Control 3 IE 335 

Operating Systems 3 IE 420 

APL/Basic 3 SO 113 

Psychology 3 

Gen. Studies Elective 6 



Total 



18 



Simulations & Applications 3 

Comp. Facilities Design 3 

Sociology 3 

Gen. Studies Elective 6 



Total 



15 



'Students with sufficient preparation will be placed in Course M 117, and will take Course M 118 

in the Spring Semester. 

In lieu of PE HI and PE 112 students may elect to take course PE 100 for 3 Semester Hours 
credit. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Technology: 121-124 Semester Hours. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ADMINISTRATION 



63 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



NORMAN I. BOTWINIK, Chairman 
President, Botwinik Brothers, Inc. 

ROBERT M. GORDON, Vice Chairman 

President, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 

GEORGE R. TIERNAN, Secretary 
Attorney at Law 

HUBERT C. HODGE, Assistant Secretary 
President, American Buckle Company 

GERY P. ALEXANDER 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

HAROLD G. ANDERSON 

The Southern Connecticut Gas Company 

JAMES Q. BENSEN 

Resident Manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

ROLAND M. BIXLER 

President, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

MRS. KINGMAN BREWSTER, JR. 

PETER H. COMSTOCK 

Chairman of the Board and President, Pratt-Read Corporation 

CHARLES H. COSTELLO 

Chairman of the Board, C. Cowles & Co. 

ABBOTT H. DAVIS, JR. 

Vice President — Marketing 

The Southern New England Telephone Company 

ROBERT B. DODDS 

Chairman of the Board, Safety Electrical Equipment Corporation 



EDWARD J. DREW 

Manager, Quinnipiack Club 

JOSEPH F. DUPLINSKY 

President of the Alumni Association 

FREDERICK G. FISCHER 

Certified Public Accountant 

JOHN A. FREY 

President, Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 

ELLIOT GANT 

Investment Banker 

NATHAN HAMILTON 

Attorney at Law 

JOHN M. HEATH 

Adjunct Professor, University of New Haven 

ROBERT T. HOWLING 

Professor, University of New Haven 

JOHN J. HUNTER 

Evening Student, University of New Haven 

PHILLIP KAPLAN 

President of the University 

WILLIAM F. LEONARD 

Vice President, Civic and Government Relations 
Olin Corporation 

JOSEPH MACHNIK 

Associate Professor, University of New Haven 

J. CLARKE MATTIMORE 

Executive-in-Residence, University of New Haven 



64 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



THE ADMINISTRATION 



ELLIS C. MAXCY 
Formerly, President 
The Southern New England Telephone Company 

TIMOTHY MELLON 

President, Eleven Thirty, Inc. 

GEORGE I. MORDECAI 

The Southern New England Telephone Company 

HERBERT H. PEARCE 

President, H. Pearce Company 

MRS. WILLIAM F. ROBINSON, SR. 

ROBERT W. RYAN 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

MRS. SHIRLEE SCHAFFER 
Writer and Commentator, WELI 

DONALD L. SHERMAN 

General Executive, YMCA of New Haven 

LOUISE J. SMITH 

Evening Student, University of New Haven 

EDWARD D. TADDEI 

Alumni Representative 

LEON J. TALALAY 

General Manager, B. F. Goodrich Sponge Products Division 

ROBERT M. TOnON 

General, Manager, New Haven Office 
New York Life Insurance Company 

MARY WALSH 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

CHARLES B. WOMER 

Director, Yale-New Haven Hospital 

FELIX ZWEIG 

Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Yale University 



PHILLIP S. KAPLAN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., President 

ALEXIS N. SOMMERS, B.M.E., M.S., Ph.D., Provost 

MARVIN K. PETERSON, B.S. in Econ., M.Ed., L.H.D., President 
Emeritus 

DOUGLAS ROBILLARD, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Arts and 
Sciences 

WARREN J. SMITH, B.A., M.B.A., Dean, School of Business Ad- 
ministration 

THOMAS C. WARNER, JR., B.E., M.S., Dean, School of Engineering 

L. CRAIG PARKER, JR., B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Director, Division of 
Criminal Justice 

JOSEPH A. PARKER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean, The Graduate School 

RICHARD M. LIPP, B.S., M.B.A., Director, Division of Continuing 

Education 

MURIEL C. MACKAY, Continuing Education Registrar 

J. MATTHEW CONNERY, B.A., M.A., Assistant Director of Con- 
tinuing Education 



FACULTY 



65 



THE FACULTY (1974-75) 



Arnold, Joseph J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Astarita, Edward, Assistant Professor, Hotel Management 
B.S.. New York University; M.S., Columbia University 

Beeken, Ramona, Assistant Professor, English 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., Trinity College 

Bell, Srilekha, Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin 

Berglund, Jerry W., Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Cooper Union; M.S., Columbia University; Ph.D., Polytechnic 
of Brooklyn 

Bernard, Joseph F., Jr., Assistant Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola University; M.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Blaskey, Joel W., Instructor, Science and Biology 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College, M.A., Fairfield University 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Bradshaw, Alfred, Assistant Professor, Sociology 
B.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Brown, David, Professor, Psychology 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Columbia University 
Consulting Psychologist (Licensed, Conn.) 

Burns, Donald, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Teachers' College, Columbia 
University 

Carriuolo, Ralf E., Assistant Professor, Humanities 
B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt College 

Carson, George R., Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, fiew York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University 
Professional Engineer (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, 

New Jersey) 
Landscape Architect (Connecticut) 

Chandra, Satlsh, Associate Professor, International Business 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; LL.B., 
Lucknow Law School, India; LL.M., J.S.D., Yale University 



Chepaitis, Joseph, Associate Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Princeton University; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

Clifford, Frank M., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Cole, Carroll P., Associate Professor, English 

B.A., Principia College; M.A., The Johns Hopkins University; M.F.A., 
D.F.A., Yale University 

Coleman, John, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S.E., University of Connecticut; M.S.I. E. University of Massachu- 
setts 

Collinson, John, Professor, Humanities 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., 
The Johns Hopkins University 

Costello, Francis J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E.. Newark College of Engineering 

Courtney, Dennis, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Ohio 
Consulting Psychologist (Licensed, Connecticut) 

Desio, Peter J., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

DInegar, Caroline, Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University (leave of 
absence) 

Dull, James, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University (on sabbatical) 

Ellison, Jerome, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Farrow, William R., Instructor, Physical Education 

B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., Southern Connecticut 
State College 



66 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Ferringer, Natalie, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B.S., Temple University; M.A., University of Virginia 

Fidler, Howard, Assistant Professor, Hotel Management 

B.S., New York University; M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Flaumenhaft, Frank, Assistant Professor, Management Science 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University (on 
sabbatical) 

French, Bruce A., Assistant Professor, Englisti 

B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; 
M.A,, Middlebury College; M.A., Harvard University (on sabbatical) 

Gangler, Joseph M., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D. Engr., Yale University 

Greet, Richard J., Associate Professor, Materials Engineering 

B.E.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Grodzinsky, Stephen, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois 

Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., Florida Institute 
of Technology 

Hale, Graham, Assistant Professor, Physics 

B.S., Ph.D., University College of London University, London, 
England 

Harricharan, Wilfred, Associate Professor, Management Science 
B.S,, M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Harrison, Robert D., Assistant Professor, Political Science 
A.B.. Amherst; M.A., Columbia; J.D., Yale University 

Hoffnung, Robert J., Associate Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati 

Horning, Darrell W., Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., S.D. School of Mines; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Howling, Robert T., Professor, English 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Penn. 
State University 

Hyman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S.. City College of New York; 
Ph.D.. University of Cincinnati 



Jensen, Gwendolyn E., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., University of Hartford; M.A., Trinity College; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Connecticut 

Jewell, Walter 0., Ill, Associate Professor, Sociology 

A.B., Harvard College; Ph.D., Harvard Graduate School 

Jordan, Camille, Visiting Assistant Professor, English 
A.B., Dillard University; A.M., University of Chicago 

Kalma, Dennis L, Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 
B.A., Knox College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Kaplan, Nathaniel, Associate Professor, English 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Kaplan, Phillip S., Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Kravet, Robert, Instructor, Accounting 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College; B.S., University of New 

Haven; M.S., University of Massachusetts 
C.P.A. (Connecticut) 

Lambrakis, Constantino C., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E.. M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute 

Lanahan, Roger P., Assistant Professor, Fire Science 
B.A., Queens College 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Lemaire, Henry, Associate Professor, Chemistry 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., California 
Institute of Technology 

Lobay, Ivan, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

Dipl., Ing., Institute of Technology, Brno, Czechoslovakia; M.E., Cen- 
tral University of Venezuela 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 



FACULTY 



67 



Machnik, Joseph A., Associate Professor, Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., Long Island University; Ph.D., University of Utah 

Maffeo, Edward J., Assistant Professor, Fine Arts 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A., Columbia University 

Maiilard, Charles A., Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Southwest Missouri State College; J.D., St. Louis University 

Mandour, Ahmed R., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., American University at Cairo; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma 

Mann, Richard A., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin 
Professional Engineer (Wisconsin) 

Marber, Allen S., Associate Professor, Management Science/Operations 
Management 

B.A., Michigan State University; M.B.A., Baruch College; C.U.N.Y., 
M.A., New York University, Ph.D., New York University 

Martin, John C, Professor, Civil Engineering 
B.E., M.E., Yale University 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 
New York University 

Mathieu, Bertrand M., Associate Professor, English 
B.A., Nasson College; M.A., University of Arizona 

McGee, Frank, Jr., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

A.B., Merrimeck College; M.P.A., Maxwell School, Syracuse Univer- 
sity 

Meier, Robert D., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Mentzer, Thomas Lee, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Penn State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Meyer, John C, Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., State University of New York, Stony Brook; M.A., State Univer- 
sity of New York, Albany 

Millen, Roger N., Associate Professor, Management Science 

B.S., M.S., University of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue University 

Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Associate Professor, Fine Arts 
B.F.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 

Montague, Richard A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.S. I.E., Columbia University 



Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Murillo, Robert, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.A., M.A., The University of New Mexico 

Naccarato, David, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., St. Mary of the Plains College; M.A., Wichita State University 

Nordlund, Kai K., Associate Professor, Finance 

LL.B., University of Helsinki; LL.M., Columbia University; D.J.S., 
New York Law School 

Nyce, William H., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S.Ch.E., University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Southern Connecticut 
State College 

O'Keefe, Daniel, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon Univer- 
sity 

Olgin, Philip, Professor, Education 

B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D., Rutgers University 

Paelet, David, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., M.S., City College of New York; Ph.D. University of Connecti- 
cut 

Parker, Joseph, Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College, M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State Uni- 
versity of New York at Buffalo 

Petersen, Wlllard, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., Yale University; M.B.A., Tuck School of Business Administra- 
tion, Dartmouth College 

Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Rajeswaran, Punnusany, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.Sc, University of Ceylon, M.Crim., University of California at 
Berkeley 

Ray, Garo W., Executive-in-Residence 

Engineering Certificate, Robert College; Consulting Engineer, FCC 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Reams, Dinwiddle C, Jr., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 
B.Ch.E., University of Virginia; M.Eng., D.Eng., Yale University 

Reimer. Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia University 
C.P.A. (Conn.) (on sabbatical) 



68 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Rich, Anne, Instructor, Accounting 

B.A., Queens College; M.B.A. University of Bridgeport 
C.P.A., (Conn.) 

Robillard, Douglas, Professor, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Robin, Gerald D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; M.A,, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Ross, Bertram, Associate Professor, Mathematics 

M.S., Wilkes College; M.S., Ph.D., Courant Institute of Mathematical 

Sciences, New York University 
Professional Engineer (New York, Ohio) 

Sack, Alien, Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A,. University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Penn State University 

Saleeby, Buddy B., Assootate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.A.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Sandman, Joshua, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B.A., M.A., New York University 

Sawhney, Shiv. L., Associate Professor, Marketing & International Busi- 
ness 
B.A., LL.B., Delhi University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Scholl, William L., Associate Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Davidson College; M.Div., Union Theological Seminary 

Sherwood, Franklin B., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Silbert, Louis, Assistant Professor. Management Science 
B.S., M.B.A.. University of Hartford 

Smitli, Donald M., Assistant Professor, English 

A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University 

Smith, Warren J., Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 

Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D.. Purdue 
University 

Stanley, Richard M., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Staugaard, Burton C, Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Stevenson, Kay G., Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., 
Yale UniversJty (on -leave of absence) 

Surti, Kantilal K., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

BE., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware; 
Ph.D.. University of Connecticut 



Teluk, John, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., University of 
New Haven, M.A., Free University, Munich 
Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois (on leave of absence) 
Tyndall, Bruce, Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 

Vasileff, Henry D., Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; M.B.A., University of Connecticut; 
Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Vieira, Florindo, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Voegeli, Henry E., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Wentworth, Ronald N., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University, M.S. I.E., University of Massa- 
chusetts 

White, William, Instructor, Transitional Studies 
B.A., Union College; M.S., Syracuse University 

Whiteman, Gilbert, Associate Professor, Communications 

A. A., LaValley Junior College, B.E., University of Nebraska; M.A., 
University of Oklahoma, Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Wiener, Bernard, Associate Professor, Marketing 
B.S., M.B.A., New York University 

Williams, Jeffrey L., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Wilson, Ned 8., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor, Science and Biology 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
F.A.I.C, Registered Chemical Consultant 

Wynne, Michael J., Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Fairfield University; M.SS.A., Case Western Reserve 

Wynschenk, Donald, Assistant Professor, Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Yanover, Ruth W., Associate Professor, Marketing 
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Zero, Martin M., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., New York University; LL.B. Brooklyn Law School; LL.M., New 
York University 

C.P.A. (New York) 
Zingale, Paul, Assistant Professor, Management 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., University of Minnesota 



University of New Have 
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